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Woodlawn National Cemetery https://www.cem.va.gov/cems/nchp/woodlawn.asp

John W. Jones Monument

Description:

This small commemorative marker made of granite and bronze is located within Woodlawn National Cemetery, the location where John W. Jones was the caretaker in charge of burying the Confederate dead of Elmira Military Prison, located nearby. It was paid for with funds raised by local high school students and Elmira citizens and dedicated in 1997. The cemetery is located beside a town cemetery, also called Woodlawn, where John W. Jones and Mark Twain (among other prominent Elmirans) are buried. The John W. Jones Museum is located across the street from the national cemetery.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Appomattox_(statue)

The Appomattox Statue

Description:

The Appomattox Statue is a bronze statue commemorating the Confederate dead of Alexandria, Virginia. A lone Confederate soldier stands facing south, towards the main battlefields of the Civil War, with his arms crossed. The figure has been the focal point of controversy throughout its existence and was finally removed on June 2, 2020, in the wake of national protests against the murder of George Floyd.

https://sites.fas.harvard.edu/~memhall/

Harvard Memorial Hall

Description:

A Hall of Harvard Alumni was proposed in 1865 to commemorate the Harvard graduates who fought for the Union during the Civil War. It was intended as ‘a symbol of Boston’s commitment to the Unionist cause and the abolitionist movement in America’, but also served a practical function-- to provide a theatre and a gathering space for visiting alumni. The final outcome of the project encompasses Sanders Theatre, Annenberg Hall, the Memorial Transept and Loker Commons, and home of the Cambridge Queen’s Head Pub.

https://www.nps.gov/ande/learn/historyculture/wirz-mon.htm

The Wirz Monument

Description:

The Wirz Monument was dedicated in 1909 by the United Daughters of the Confederacy to commemorate, and exonerate, Captain Heinrich Hartmann Wirz who served as the commander of the Andersonville Civil War Prison between 1864-65. Wirz was hanged in Washington, DC in 1865 with a conviction of murder and conspiracy by a military tribunal.

https://www.nps.gov/nr/Travel/richmond/index.html

The Robert E. Lee Monument

Description:

The first and largest monument created for Monument Avenue, the Robert E. Lee Monument was a focal point in Richmond, Virginia. It was composed of two distinct parts: a prominent base, designed by Paul Pujol, and a large statue designed by the renowned French sculptor Antonin Mercié, that featured Lee atop his horse, Traveller, looking out proudly over the streets. The Monument has long been a source of controversy and was finally dismantled and removed on 8 September 2021.

https://www.nps.gov/saga/learn/historyculture/the-shaw-memorial.htm

The Shaw Memorial

Description:

The Shaw Memorial is a bronze relief sculpture that commemorates the service of the 54th Regiment Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, one of the first black regiment organised to fight in the Civil War. It was unveiled in Boston in 1897 and depicts Robert Gould Shaw leading the infantry as they march towards South Carolina. The monument is considered one of the greatest Civil War monuments in the United States.

https://www.unc.edu/

"Silent Sam" Soldier Statue

Description:

This monument was erected by United Daughters of the Confederacy on the University of North Carolina campus in 1913 in honour of the alumni who served as Confederate soldiers in the Civil War. From 1954 onwards, it became known as "Silent Sam”, a comment on the statue’s apparent ability to fire its gun when a virgin walked by. In August 2018, the monument was toppled by protestors and its future display remains contested.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jefferson_Davis_Highway

Jefferson Davis Highway

Description:

The Jefferson Davis Highway was a project sponsored by the United Daughters of the Confederacy in the early of 1910s to commemorate the President of the Confederate States, Jefferson Davis. The planned route traverses from Arlington, Virginia to San Diego, California, however, it is unknown whether the plan was fully realised due to conflict between the National Auto Trail movement and the federal government. The location identified on the map is the Highway’s proposed starting point.

http://chicagopublicart.blogspot.com/2013/09/abraham-lincoln-man-standing-lincoln.html

Abraham Lincoln: The Man

Description:

The Standing Lincoln Statue in Chicago created by Augustus Saint-Gaudens is considered to be one of the most famous portrayals of the President. It depicts Lincoln standing before a chair in a reflective but also decisive mode. There are several replicas of the sculpture in London, Mexico City, New York, Boston and on the farm near Hodgenville, Kentucky where Lincoln was born.

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/5a/Lincoln_Lincoln_Park.jpg

Abraham Lincoln: The Man

Description:

The Standing Lincoln Statue in Chicago made by Augustus Saint-Gaudens in 1887 is considered to be one of the most outstanding and typical portrayal of President Lincoln. The design with a chair behind the president is an innovative expression which break through traditional conventions. There are several replicas in London, Mexico City, New York, Boston and on the farm near Hodgenville, Kentucky where Lincoln was born.

https://www.johnwjonesmuseum.org/

John W. Jones Museum

Description:

The John W. Jones’ house museum in Elmira, New York is an interactive museum to record and honour the contribution of the former slave, John W. Jones who is an activist int the Underground Railroad during 1850s and became the sexton of Woodlawn Cemetery since 1859. He had helped almost 800 slaves escape to Canada and held the burial of approximately 3000 Confederate soldiers deceased in the Elmira Prison Camp. The house was John’s residence during his lifetime. It was not paid much attention until the late 1990s that some citizens saw the value of it. The museum now records the story of John and his contemporaries and the abolitionism history at that time.

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Memorial_to_Frazar_Stearns.jpg

A Cannon as Memorial to Frazar Stearns

Description:

The cannon stored in Amherst College is a movable memorial to one of its students Frazar Stearns. During the war, Frazar followed his chemistry professor to attend the Battle of New Bern and was killed there. The cannon was brought back along with Frazar’s coffin and is treated as a substitute of the bright young man.

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:An_unusual_headstone_-_Stonewall_Jackson%27s_arm_ended_up_here_after_it_was_amputated,_a_few_days_before_he_died_-_panoramio.jpg

Stonewall Jackson's Arm

Description:

In 1863, a historic Civil War battle was fought near Chancellorsville. In this battle, Stonewall Jackson was accidentally shot by his troops and lost one of his arms. The arm was originally buried in Ellwood Manor nearby and was given a Christian burial at that time. It was dug up in 1864 by Union soldiers and now its exact location is unknown. A granite stone bearing the inscription, ‘Arm of Stonewall Jackson, May 3, 1863’, was set by his staff officer in 1903 but it is questionable whether the marker is accurately placed.

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/11/Sanders_theater_2009y.JPG

Harvard Memorial Hall

Description:

The Memorial Hall was proposed to commemorate the Harvard graduates who fought for the Union cause in the Civil War as well as to meet the demand of a theatre and a gathering space for alumni. Currently, it houses Sanders Theatre, Annenberg Hall, the Memorial Transept and Loker Commons, and home of the Cambridge Queen’s Head pub.

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/c/c0/Captain_Henry_Wirz_obelisk_%28cropped%29.JPG

The Wirz Monument

Description:

The Wirz Monument was dedicated by the United Daughters of the Confederacy to commemorate Captain Heinrich Hartmann Wirz who served as the commander of the Andersonville Civil War Prison between 1864-65 and was hanged in Washington, DC in 1865 with a conviction of murder and conspiracy by a military tribunal.

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/85/Appomattox_statue_in_Alexandria.jpg

The Appomatox Statue

Description:

The Appomatox Statue is a bronze statue commemorating the Confederate dead of Alexandria, Virginia. A lone Confederate soldier stands facing south, the general direction of the battlefields of the Civil War, with his arm crossed. The figure has been undergone and is still in violent controversy over its meaning since the erection.

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/3/38/Statue_Robert_E._Lee_Richmond.JPG

The Robert E. Lee Monument

Description:

As the first and the largest monument in Monument Avenue, the Robert E. Lee Monument is a focal point in Richmond, Virginia. It was erected in 1890 based on a painting of Robert Lee by Adalbert Volck. The monument is composed of two distinct parts: the base and the statue with Lee siting on his horse Traveller and looking over the streets proudly.

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/7/7b/St_GaudensShaw_Mem.jpg

The Shaw Memorial

Description:

The Shaw Memorial is a bronze relief sculpture unveiled in Boston in 1897 to commemorate the fallen of 54th Regiment Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry and their contribution. It depicts Robert Gould Shaw leading his infantry which consists of black soldiers marching towards South Carolina with Shaw erecting on his horse and the men marching alongside. The monument is considered as one of the greatest Civil War monument in America.

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/a7/Silent_Sam.jpg

"Silent Sam" Soldier Statue

Description:

This monument was erected by United Daughters of the Confederacy in the University of North Carolina in 1913. It started to be known as "Silent Sam" since 1954 reported in a Student newspaper. However, it was toppled by protestors in August 2018 and was removed to a security place. It is still in great controevrsy today whether and where it should be represented.

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/7/7b/Jefferson_Davis_Memorial_Highway%2C_Dublin%2C_GA%2C_US.jpg

Jefferson Davis Highway

Description:

Jefferson Davis Highway was a project sponsored by the United Daughters of the Confederacy in the early of 1910s to commemorate the President of the Confederate States, Jefferson Davis. The planned route ranges from Arlington, Virginia to San Diego, California. However due to the conflict between the National Auto Trail movement and the federal government, it is even unknown whether the plan has ever been completed.

https://www.greenvillesc.gov/299/War-Memorials

Greenville County Confederate Monument

Description:

This Confederate monument was created in 1891 to honor the Confederate dead of Greenville County. James Blackman Ligon, who was the chief of police in Greenville, served as the model for the sculpture. The monument was originally erected in the center of the Main Street where traffic is quite busy. Its removal was considered on several occasions because of this hazardous position. In 1924, it was reassembled in Springwood Cemetery where it continues to stand today.

https://www.hmdb.org/Photos/51/Photo51904o.jpg

Greenville County Confederate Monument

Description:

This Confederate monument was created in 1891 to honor the Confederate dead in the Civil War with James Blackman Ligon who was the chief of police in Greenville as the model. The monument was originally erected in the center of the Main Street where the traffic is quite busy. The removal of it was raised several times because some thought it would cause traffic concerns. In 1924, it was reassembled in Springwood Cemetery and has been laid there until today.

https://mhl.org/

Memorial Hall Library

Description:

Funded by local people, the Memorial Hall Library in Andover was constructed in 1873. It serves as a town library as well as a memorial to the soldiers who fought in the Civil War. Its architectural style is a combination of Italianate design and the Colonial Revival. In 1982, it was added to the list of National Register of Historic Places.

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/91/AndoverMA_MemorialHallLibrary.jpg

Memorial Hall Library

Description:

Funded by the local, the Memorial Hall Library was constructed in 1873 as town libray as well as the monument of the soldiers who made contribution to the Civil War. The architectural style combines the original Italianate and the Colonial Revival during later renovation. In 1982, it was added into the list of Register of Historic Places.

https://www.in.gov/iwm/2335.htm

Soldiers and Sailors Monument

Description:

The Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument was erected in downtown Indianapolis in 1902. It was originally designed to commemorate the Hoosiers in the Civil War but expanded to include soldiers who served in the Revolutionary War, the War of 1812, and the Mexican War as well. In addition to the statue of Victory atop, the monument is surrounded by several famous sculptural groups. Over the years, the monument has become a symbol of the city and even the state of Indiana at large.

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/29/Monument_Circle%2C_Indianapolis%2C_Indiana%2C_USA.jpg

Soldiers and Sailors Monument

Description:

The Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument was erected in the downtown of Indianapolis in 1902. It was originally designed to commemorate the Hoosiers in the Civil War and the range expanded into the soldiers who served in the Revolutionary War, the War of 1812, the Mexican War, etc. In addition to the statue of Victory atop, the monument has several famous sculptures around it. Over the years, the monument has become the symbol of the city and even the whole Indiana.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Confederate_Soldiers_and_Sailors_Monument_(Indianapolis)

Confederate Soldiers and Sailors Monument

Description:

The Confederate Soldiers and Sailors Monument was erected by the U.S. Government in 1912 to commemorate the Confederate prisoners who died in Camp Morton. It was originally placed at Greenlawn Cemetery, where 1,616 soldiers were buried, but was later moved near Garfield Park following the closure of the previous location. The monument was once attacked in 2017 when a man vandalized it with a hammer. A fence now surrounds the monument to protect it against similar actions.

https://www.atlasobscura.com/places/civil-war-nurses-memorial

Nuns of the Battlefield

Description:

This Civil War Nurses Memorial in Washington D.C. was raised by Ellen Ryan Jolly and designed by Irish artist Jerome Connor to honor the nuns who looked after soldiers on both sides of the American Civil War. The memorial consists of a granite base and a bas relief atop. Titled "Nuns of the Battlefield", the relief represents 12 nuns arranged in different postures and involved in acts of care.

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/b/b9/Nuns_of_the_Battlefield_bas_relief.jpg

Nuns of the Battlefield

Description:

This Civil War Nurses Memorial in Washington D.C. is a monument raised by Ellen Ryan Jolly and designed by Irish artist Jerome Connor to honor the nuns who looked after soldiers on both sides during the American Civil War. The memorial consists of a granite base and a bas relief atop named "Nuns of the Battlefield" presenting 12 nuns with different postures.

https://hollywoodcemetery.org/visit/things-to-see/105-monument-to-the-confederate-war-dead

Monument to the Confederate War Dead

Description:

The Monument of Confederate War Dead at Hollywood Cemetery is a large granite pyramid. It was proposed by the Hollywood Ladies Memorial Association to commemorate the 18,000 Confederate soldiers buried in the cemetery. Designed by the engineer Charles H. Dimmock in 1896, the 27m construction is the cemetery’s most famous feature and attracts many tourists each year.

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/3/32/Richmond_Virginia_Hollywood_cemetery_-_the_pyramid_to_%22Our_Confederate_Dead%22_-_panoramio.jpg

Monument to the Confederate War Dead

Description:

The Monument of Confederate War Dead at Hollywood Cemetery is a granite pyramid suggested by the Hollywood Ladies Memorial Association to commemorate the 18,000 Confederate soldiers buried in the cemetery and designed by the engineer Charles H. Dimmock in 1896. The 27m construction has become the symbol of the cemetery and attracts many tourists every year.

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/3/3d/NOLAWhiteLeagueMonumentByTracks.jpg

Battle of Liberty Place Monument

Description:

The Battle of Liberty Place Monument is an obelisk erected shortly after the Battle of Liberty Place, an 1874 contest between the Democratic White League and the Reconstruction Era Louisiana state government over the control of the government of Louisiana, to commemorate the event. Due to its controversy of White Supremacy, the monument was removed in 2017 and kept in storage since then.

Underground Railroad Memorial Plaque

Description:

This inconspicuous memorial lies in the corner of a McDonald's parking lot in Maywood, Chicago. The location was once the site of the Ten Mile Freedom House where abolitionists helped enslaved people escape from the South in the mid-19th century. The plaque was placed to mark the former house and to honor the contribution of Harriet Tubman whose role in the Underground Railroad was pivotal.

https://www.atlasobscura.com/places/underground-railroad-memorial-mcdonalds

Underground Railroad Memorial Plaque

Description:

This unconspicuous memorial is laid in the corner of a McDonald's parking lot in Maywood, Chicago. The location once was the Ten Mile Freedom House where abolitionists helped slaveries escape from the South in the mid-19th century. A plaque was placed there to mark the former house and honor the contribution of Harriet Tubman and the Underground Railroad to abolitionism.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emancipation_Memorial

Emancipation Memorial

Description:

The Emancipation Memorial was erected in 1876 in Lincoln Park, Washington D.C. It depicts President Lincoln in the act of emancipating an enslaved African American who is shown half kneeling at his feet. The design, by sculptor Thomas Ball, makes a stark visual hierarchy between these two men and has been criticised for its racism. The future of this memorial, and other copies of it, in public space is uncertain.

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/80/Emancipation_statue_at_Lincoln_Park_%2814131873%29.jpg

Emancipation Memorial

Description:

The Emancipation Memorial was erected in 1876 in Lincoln Park, Washington D.C. to honour President Lincoln for his contribution to the country. It depicts President Lincoln standing still and emancipating an African American slave who half kneeling in front of Lincoln. The design is criticized by someone because it has the potential to disrespect the black people.

http://straylight.cs.st-andrews.ac.uk/americancivilwar/galleries/upload/An_Ode_in_Time_of_Hesitation

An Ode in Time of Hesitation

Description:

An Ode in Time of Hesitation is a poem by William Vaughn Moody after seeing the Shaw monument at Boston. It is considered to give expressions on the problem “how to reconcile our imperialistic aims in the Philippines with ideal for which this country was founded”.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_New_Bern#Advance

Battle of New Bern

Description:

The Battle of New Bern was fought near New Bern, North Carolina on March 14, 1862. The Belligerents are the US Army's Coast Division, Union soldiers led by Ambrose Burnside and the Confederate soldiers led by Lawrence O'B. Branch. The Union won the battle and took control of the area for the rest of the war.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Liberty_Place

Battle of Liberty Place

Description:

The Battle of Liberty Place is a contest happened on September 14,1874 between the Democratic White League and the Reconstruction Era Louisiana state government. It was resulted from the controversial 1872 gubernatorial election that both Democrat and Republican sides claimed victory. The insurrection lasted for three days until Federal troops came to calm down the event.

Homepage

The United Daughters of the Confederacy

Description:

The United Daughters of the Confederacy was an organization established by female descendant of the Confederate soldiers since1894 in Nashville, Tennessee. The main goals of the organization include to honour the Confederated soldiers served in the Civil War, to protect related heritages and erect Confederate memorials.

Homepage

Sons of Confederate Veterans

Description:

The Sons of Confederate Veterans is a non-profit organization founded in 1896 to commemorate the Confederated soldiers, to protect historic heritages of the Civil War and erect Confederate memorials. It is the successor of the United Confederate Veterans, an organization established in 1889 by Confederate veterans and extinct in 1951 and affiliation of the United Daughters of the Confederacy.

Battle of New Bern

Description:

The Battle of New Bern was fought near New Bern, North Carolina on March 14, 1862 where Frazar Stearns lost his life. The Belligerents are the US Army's Coast Division, Union soldiers led by Ambrose Burnside and the Confederate soldiers led by Lawrence O'B. Branch. The Union won the battle and take control of the area for the rest of the war.

https://www.poemhunter.com/poem/he-gave-away-his-life/

He gave away his life

Description:

He Gave away his Life is commonly considered as a poem which Emily Dickinson written for Frazar Stearns, a young man who lost his life in the Battle of New Bern. She expressed her emotion to regrettable death of the family’ s close friend and beloved man and questioned the meaning of the well-designed funeral at the same time. For the poem, please visit https://www.poemhunter.com/poem/he-gave-away-his-life/.

http://straylight.cs.st-andrews.ac.uk/americancivilwar/galleries/upload/JOHN_W._JONES__The_Southwest_s_Unsung_Civil_War_Hero

JOHN W. JONES: The Southwest's Unsung Civil War Hero

Description:

This is an article by Don M. Mahan published in the Journal of Arizona History in the autumn of 2019. It reviews the life experience from cradle to grave and elaborates his contributions to Arizona and southwestern history as a successful businessman and citizen full of social responsibility.

http://straylight.cs.st-andrews.ac.uk/americancivilwar/galleries/upload/The_Andersonville_Trial

The Andersonville Trial

Description:

The Andersonville Trial is a Broadway play written by Saul Levitt and was presented in 1959 which focuses on the actual trial of Henry Wirz happened in 1865. The play was adapted to television drama in 1970 and won the 1971 Emmy Awards and a Peabody Award.

Ladd and Whitney Monument

Description:

A granite obelisk some twenty seven and a half feet in height with a cruciform base, the Ladd and Whitney Monument was erected in memory of Luther Crawford Ladd and Addison Ottis Whitney, residents of Lowell. Ladd and Whitney, who are widely reported to have been the first fatalities of the Civil War, are buried beneath the monument alongside fellow soldier from the 6th Massachusetts Regiment, Charles A. Taylor.

The Rockery

Description:

The Rockery is a memorial cairn created by ‘The Father of American Landscape Architecture’, Frederick Law Olmsted. Olmsted preferred the cairn to masonry or sculpture as he envisaged the symbolic growth of plants over the rockery of battle; its crest is made up of 47 stones – one for each of the Easton men killed during the Civil War.

Pittsfield Soldiers' Monument

Description:

Also known as ‘The Color Bearer’, this monument features a statue of an idealised Union Color Sergeant, cast from condemned cannon, atop a granite column. On the east and west faces are presented the State of Massachusetts and United States seals, while the north and south sides are reserved for the names of the 108 Pittsfield men who died in the Civil War.

Greenfield Soldiers' Monument

Description:

Located in the town common, the Soldiers’ Monument honours the 50 Greenfield men who were killed in action during the Civil War. Artist James G. Batterson’s study of Egyptology is noticeable in the design of the granite column, which is topped by a bronze Eagle defending its nest against the serpents of secession and copperheads.

Barnstable Soldiers’ Monument

Description:

Dedicated in July of 1866, the Barnstable’s Soldiers’ Monument was among the first Civil War memorials to be erected in the state of Massachusetts. A granite obelisk standing at 15ft, the monument features the names of many local war heroes alongside the primary inscription: “They died for their country.”

Henry Merritt Camp Memorial

Description:

Located in Salem’s Greenlawn Cemetery, the Henry Merritt Camp Memorial was dedicated in 1886 in honour of town native Lieutenant Colonel Henry Merritt, who was killed during the Battle of New Bern in April 1862. The Memorial is made from the zinc, or ‘white bronze’, of the Monumental Bronze Company, and features the company’s popular color bearer figure which can be seen in Civil War monuments throughout the United States.

Soldiers’ Memorial Fountain

Description:

Oak Bluffs’ Soldiers' Memorial Fountain, though erected by Confederate veteran Charles Strahan, depicts a Union soldier and was dedicated to the Henry Clay Wade Post of the GAR in 1891. Strahan’s hope that he might receive some similar dedication was realised in 1925 when an additional tablet was placed on the fountain in honour of the Civil War’s Confederate soldiers. This tablet, thought to have been the first memorial to Confederate soldiers by those of the Union, was removed in May of 2019.

Colonel Thomas Cass

Description:

Erected in 1899, this monument to Colonel Thomas Cass of the Ninth Massachusetts Infantry stands on the same spot in the Boston Public Gardens where a previous statue of Cass was placed ten years before. Following a series of complaints about the original granite sculpture’s likeness of the Colonel, artist Richard E. Brooks was hired to design the current bronze statue, for which he was awarded a gold medal at the Exposition Universelle in 1900.

Equestrian Statue of Joseph Hooker

Description:

Located in the grounds of Boston’s Massachusetts State House, this equestrian statue of General Joseph Hooker was a collaborative effort between Daniel Chester French and Edward Clark Potter, who designed figure and horse respectively. Hooker is best remembered for his defeat at the 1863 Battle of Chancellorsville against Robert E. Lee’s Confederate Army of Northern Virginia. The monument was dedicated in 1903.

Equestrian Statue of General Charles Devens

Description:

Standing in front of the Old Worcester County Courthouse, this monument depicts Worcester County’s only major general of the Civil War, Charles Devens, though it honours all men of the county who fought for the Union. Present at the dedication in July 1906 was soon-to-be President William H. Taft, who also made a brief address. The artist, Daniel Chester French, had designed Boston's Equestrian Statue of Joseph Hooker several years earlier.

Haverhill Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Monument

Description:

The first piece of public sculpture to be erected in the city of Haverhill, this monument was dedicated in 1869 in honour of the 187 local men who lost their lives fighting the Civil War. Standing at 20 feet tall, both statue and base are crafted from marble, and were executed by Haverhill stone-carver Patrick McLaughlin. McLaughlin modelled the standing soldier on his son Frank, a veteran of the 17th and 50th Massachusetts Infantries.

Fitchburg Civil War Memorial

Description:

Fitchburg’s Civil War Memorial, comprised of three bronze statues upon a granite base, was designed by celebrated sculptor Martin Milmore and was dedicated in June 1874. The central and highest figure is an allegorised depiction of America, with a laurel wreath in each hand, and is flanked by a soldier and a sailor. Inside the monument’s base is a box containing a plethora of Civil War documents pertaining to the town’s veterans and the contracting of the monument itself. Also contained is a cannonball which was fired at the Battle of Bennington in 1777, complementing the two cannons which are displayed alongside the memorial in Fitchburg’s Monument Park.

Memorial Municipal Building

Description:

Now functioning as Norwood’s Town Hall, the Memorial Municipal Building began construction in 1927 and was dedicated on November 11th the following year in memory of the Norwood residents who had given their lives in the Civil and First World Wars. Made of Weymouth granite, the building was designed by William G. Upham in a Late Gothic Revival style, and in its bell-tower houses the Walter F. Tilton Memorial Carillon, the seventh-largest carillon in the United States. On November 11th, 1998 the building was rededicated.

Nancy Buswell’s Civil War Flag

Description:

Haverhill resident and local milliner Nancy Buswell is said to have created this silk flag in the space of just 56 hours in April 1861 before the Hale Guards, in which her brother E. K. Davis was a soldier, left for war. The flag was present at the Battle of Bull Run in July 1861, but was soon thought to have been lost amidst the chaos of the Civil War. It was not until 1904 that the flag was recovered and returned to Major Howe Post 47, and is now exhibited at The Buttonwoods Museum in Haverhill.

Riverdale Martyrs Monument

Description:

The fourth of six monuments erected in Gloucester in honour of those who fought in the Civil War, the Riverdale Martyrs Monument was dedicated in June 1886. A granite obelisk, this monument records the names of 15 Massachusetts men who gave their lives for the Union, and on its tablet are represented the badges of the corps with which they fought.

Sphinx

Description:

Commissioned and conceptualised by Dr. Jacob Bigelow, the architect of Mount Auburn Cemetery in which it is placed, the Sphinx was made by Martin Milmore in collaboration with his brother, Joseph. Made of Hallowell granite and 15 feet in length, the Sphinx, as in Egyptian mythology, appears as a reclining lion with woman’s head, but is here presented with the additional features of a U.S. military medallion and a bald eagle on the headdress, thus representing the future of shared African and American culture envisaged by Bigelow. It commemorates all those who fell in the Civil War, and is noticeable for the unusually emancipatory tone of its inscription, which reads: ‘American Union Preserved; African Slavery Destroyed; By the Uprising of a Great People; By the Blood of Fallen Heroes’. While no official dedication is recorded, the monument had been placed within the cemetery by September 1871; its enigmatic nature is captured in Charlotte Fiske Bates’s 1879 poem ’The Sphinx at Mount Auburn’.

Marshfield Soldiers' Monument

Description:

Located in the Marshfield Hills Cemetery, this Soldiers’ Monument is made entirely of Quincy granite and is comprised of a Union soldier at parade rest atop a trilogy of bases. Its primary inscription memorialises the 21 Marshfield men who died in the Civil War, among whom was Fletcher Webster, son of former Massachusetts senator Daniel Webster. Erected through appropriations by the town’s residents, the monument was erected in 1889 but not dedicated until June 15, 1895.

Arlington Soldiers' Monument

Description:

A victory column of classic design, Arlington’s Soldier’s Monument, made up of three different types of granite rising to 42 feet, is surmounted by a stone eagle. The column's primary inscription is dedicated to the remembrance of Arlington’s Union soldiers who lost their lives during the Civil War, each of which is inscribed on the Westerly red granite along the sides of the column; these sides are further ornamented with fluted pilasters, wreaths, and lion heads. The monument was dedicated on June 17, 1887.

Taunton Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument

Description:

This Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Monument is located on the east side of Taunton Green, and was dedicated on June 4, 1902. Crafted entirely of Westerly granite, the monument is comprised of three bases, rising to 15 feet and featuring militaristic relief images, surmounted by an 8 foot Union soldier standing at parade rest; made by the hand of notable sculptor Carl Conrads, it was erected by Taunton resident Cyrus H. Lothrop in honour of those from the city who fought in the Civil War.

Gloucester Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument

Description:

Located beside Gloucester’s City Hall, the town’s Soldier’s and Sailors’ Monument, also known as Liberty Statue, was dedicated September 11, 1879 through the efforts of the Col. Allen Post 45 of the G. A. R. The monument is comprised of an imposing column of granite and bronze surmounted by a statue representing the ‘Goddess of Liberty’, and memorialises all those who fought ‘for Preservation of the Union’ in the Civil War.

Farmington Civil War Memorial

Description:

Description: Located in Farmington’s Meetinghouse Park, this obelisk monument commemorates the 378 Soldiers and Sailors of Farmington, who were either killed or missing in action. The monument was funded by George W. Ranger, a private in the 53rd Mass. Infantry and the 6th Maine Battery Light Artillery and presented to the town in memory of his comrades who were killed during the war. The monument itself was made by the Hallowell Granite Company, and is a copy of the 16th Maine Regiment Monument located at Gettysburg. It was erected in 1903.

Boston Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Monument

Description:

Located on Flag Staff Hill in the city's Common and reaching over 125 feet in height, Boston's Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Monument is one of Massachusetts' most striking Civil War memorials. The monument features a statue embodying ‘America’, flanked by a quartet of marble eagles, atop a 75 foot Roman column; a further four statues, representing the points of the reunited nation, are included at the column’s base. Projecting the plinth are another set of allegorical figures, representing Peace, the Sailor, the Muse of History, and the Citizen-Soldier, which had, until 2014, been stored away from public display. The memorial's plinth includes a bas-relief tablet of bronze on each of its four sides, depicting an array of Civil War scenes featuring notable Bay Staters. The Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Monument was dedicated on September 17, 1877, over a decade after artist Martin Milmore’s submitted design.

Wilton's Standing Soldier Monument

Description:

Located in the Town Square of Wilton, this monument was funded by E. W. Woodman G.A.R. Post, the Woman’s Relief Corps and the Citizens of Wilton. It was created by Lewiston Monumental Works and is dedicated to the Men of Wilton who served during the Civil War 1861-1865. The monument is made of granite and depicts a Union soldier standing at ease, it was erected in 1912 and dedicated in the same year.

Bath Civil War Soldiers' Monument

Description:

The Bath Civil War Soldiers' Monument is located opposite the Sagadahoc County Court House, and at the intersection of Centre Street and High Street. It is dedicated to the men of Bath who died during the American Civil War 1861 - 1865. $4975 was funded by the City of Bath for its creation, and it was designed by C.J. Noyes and created by William Hogan. This monument is a quartz obelisk over 30 feet high; surmounted by an eagle; and has four marble tables placed into each of the sides. In front, a cannon is placed, this is one of two which were taken from Fort Popham, Phippsburg (Maine) and was donated by the War Department to the city in 1902. The second cannon is located in Oak Grove Cemetery. The monument lists the names of the 109 men who died during the War and bears a quote from Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg address. This is one of the first Civil War Monuments to be erected in Maine.

Oak Grove Civil War Memorial

Description:

This Soldiers' Civil War Memorial is situated in the Grand Army Lot, Oak Grove Cemetery. It was funded and erected by the Sedgwick Post No. 4, G.A.R. It was dedicated on May 30, 1896 and is to the Veterans of the United States Army and Navy who served during the American Civil War 1861 – 1865. It was created by the Hallowell Granite Company. The memorial depicts a Union Soldier at parade rest. Located next to the memorial is one of two cannons from Fort Popham, Phippsburg (Maine) and was donated by the War Department to the city in 1902.

Bowdoin Civil War Memorial

Description:

Located near the Bowdoin Town Store and on the corner of the intersection of Litchfield Road and Main Street, this Memorial is dedicated to the Bowdoin Veterans who served during the American Civil War 1861 - 1865. It was dedicated by Governor William T. Cobb in 1907. The Monument is made of granite and surmounted by a sphere, it is also accompanied by a cast-iron Rodman Gun from Fort Popham, Phippsburg. The monument is inscribed with a list of 128 names.

Bowdoinham Civil War Monument

Description:

The town of Bowdoinham’s Civil War Monument is an 1864 cast-iron Rodman Gun weighing about 4.2 tons and is fixed to a granite base. It is situated at the intersection of Main Street (Route 24) in Bowdoinham. Two different committees were formed over the course of the scheduling of the monument due to a disagreement about a suitable location. Mr. W. B. Kendall, a member of the first committee, secured a Rodman Gun from Fort Popham, Phippsburg and had it delivered to the town on April 26, 1905. The monument was funded by the town of Bowdoinham, private contributors, and a collection generated from a concert organised by Mr. Gay. The monument was dedicated on August 18, 1909. The original sculpted granite base has been replaced, so has the accompanying flagpole and pile of cannon balls.

Caribou Veterans Memorial Park Statue

Description:

Situated in the Veteran’s Memorial Park opposite the Nylander Museum-Natural History this soldier’s statue is dedicated to the men of Lyndon (now Caribou), who served and died during the American Civil War 1861 – 1865. The monument is made of granite and depicts a Union soldier at parade holding the Union flag. The monument was funded by the Ansel G. Taylor Womans Relief Corps No. 97. The monument was unveiled on May 30th, 1918 by Austin Poland, the great grandson of local hero Ansel G. Taylor (1824-1864) a private in the Company F of “Bakers” First D.C Cavalry, died July 7th, 1864. Both the G.A.R post no. 95 and Womans Relief Corps no. 97 bear his namesake. The ceremony also included Lincoln’s Gettysburg address by Professor A. W. Boston and several other addresses and prayers by other prominent local figures.

Houlton Civil War Monument

Description:

Located at Monument Park in the Town of Houlton, this Union Soldiers' monument is dedicated to the soldiers and sailors of Houlton who lost their lives during the American Civil War. In 1902 the Great Fire of Houlton destroyed a large portion of the town centre, a section of the burned area was later used for the construction of a park, the monument, and the Cary Library. The monument, constructed by the Houlton Granite and Marble Works, is made of granite and consists of a multitiered base surmounted by a Union soldier depicted at parade rest. The Lower section has a mounted bronze plaque, this plaque honours a native of Houlton: Major General Henry C. Merriam. Merriam served as a Lieutenant Colonel and commanded the 73rd United States Colored Troops Infantry Regiment. The platform of the monument is decorated with eight evenly-spaced cannonballs. The monument was funded by the Town of Houlton and private subscription, and it was dedicated on May 31, 1909.

Presque Isle’s Civil War Monument

Description:

This fifteen-foot high marble obelisk with a four-foot square granite base, surmounted with a sculpture of an eagle, is Presque Isle’s Civil War Monument and was formerly known as the “Soldier’s Monument”. It is located in Fairmount Cemetery and it memorialises soldiers who served and died during the American Civil War, 1861 – 1865. This monument was built by S.P. Bradbury of Bangor, and it bears thirty-eight names of soldiers from the town. The monument was erected in 1873 by the town of Presque Isle and was funded by collections from local women. The monument was dedicated on July 4, 1874. The ceremony was presided over by Reverend Collamore Purington, who had served in the war as a Chaplain of the 7th Maine Volunteer Infantry and James Phair, a local Civil War Veteran, served as Marshall of the Day.

Colby Memorial Hall

Description:

Originally located on the old Colby College campus, on College Avenue, this Memorial Hall was erected for new college classrooms and was dedicated to the students and graduates of Colby College who fought and died during the American Civil War 1861 – 1865. The Memorial Hall was designed by Alexander Esty of Boston, and the building consisted of a chapel on the west wing, an alumni hall on the second floor, a library in the east wing, and a belfry tower. The Hall was funded by Colby College, Ladies of Bangor and public subscription. Installed into the east wall of Alumni hall was another memorial, based on the Lion of Lucerne, and accompanied by a tablet inscribed with the names of the Union soldiers. The hall was dedicated on August 10, 1869. However, the college was moved to Mayflower Hill during the 20th Century, and the hall was later razed along with the rest of the old campus in 1966.

Springfield Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument

Description:

Springfield’s Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Monument is an imposing granite column of over 40 feet topped by a standing Union soldier. Funded by Gurdon Bill, a wealthy local resident who later became President of the Springfield & New London Railroad Company, the memorial was then gifted to the Wilcox Post 16 of the G. A. R. The Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Monument, which was created at the cost of $10,000, was erected in Springfield’s Court Square and dedicated on September 29, 1885; contemporaneous reports affirm that over 1200 men were involved in the dedicatory procession. The monument’s bronze tablets include an excerpt from Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address, and honour the 2,485 Springfield soldiers who fought in the Civil War as well as all those who died for the Union cause. The monument was designed by M. H. Mosman, as stated on its west-side tablet, however the statue cast was provided by the Ames Foundry in Chicopee; it’s likeness can be seen in several other Massachusetts memorials.

Framingham Civil War Memorial

Description:

Depicting a Union soldier at parade rest, this memorial statue was dedicated on February 22, 1873 and originally resided within the Edgell Memorial Library which it now guards. This move was reportedly caused by an inability of the library authorities to enforce the building’s dress code: seeing the standing soldier in full uniform, patrons would often refuse to uncover their own hats. The memorial was largely funded by Framingham resident George Phipps, who provided the required $3,000 upon the request of local patriot George G. Brown. Mr Phipps is anecdotally said to have begrudgingly parted with the money, remarking “There’s a check for your brazen image.” The statue is taken from an original prototype by sculptor Martin Milmore for a monument in Charlestown in 1871. Framingham’s version, in bronze, was cast by Ames Foundry in Chicopee.

https://framinghamhistory.org

Edgell Memorial Library

Description:

Located in Framingham’s Centre Common, the Edgell Memorial Library was built in 1872 and dedicated on February 22, 1873. A distinctive structure with a purple and red slate roof, the Library stands as one of the few remaining Gothic buildings in the area. Opening as the town’s first public library, it was dedicated to the 530 Framingham men who served in the Civil War; tablets inside list the names of 27 locals who were killed in action. When the town moved its library in 1963, the Edgell Memorial Library was saved from destruction by the Framingham Historical Society, and was converted into an exhibition and office space. Within the library’s permanent exhibition is a marble bust of General George H. Gordon, Framingham’s highest ranking officer in the Civil War. The bust was designed by Daniel C. French, and was gifted to the library by members of the Second Massachusetts Infantry. The building also houses the restored colors of the 13th Massachusetts Infantry. In April 2011, restorative work on the Edgell Memorial Library was completed to coincide with the 150th anniversary of the beginning of the Civil War.

North Weymouth Soldiers’ Monument

Description:

Residing on an eminence in North Weymouth Cemetery, ‘one of the oldest cemeteries still in use in the United States’, the Soldiers' Monument stands at 25 feet and was dedicated on July 4, 1868. An obelisk of Quincy granite, this monument is flanked by naval canons and was placed in honour of the 99 men from Weymouth who are known to have died during the Civil War. The name, company, regiment, age and cause of death of each of these soldiers is on the obelisk inscribed; these inscriptions were originally written on appended marble tablets that have since been removed. While the monument’s planning committee had reportedly planned for each of Weymouth’s four villages to erect a monument, North Weymouth’s Soldiers’ Monument remains the town’s only Civil War memorial. It was rededicated on May 12, 2018.

Nantucket Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Monument

Description:

Located in Monument Square, Nantucket's Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Monument replaced the island’s old ‘Liberty Pole’ upon its 1874 erection; it was dedicated on May 29, 1875. The memorial is comprised of an obelisk, constructed by Quincy Marble Works and transported to Nantucket by schooner, atop a granite millstone from the local Old North Grist Mill. Owing to Nantucket's Quaker roots, the island had previously abstained from armed conflict, but sent a total of 339 soldiers, notably more than its quota, to fight for the Union cause. Upon the shaft of the Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Monument are inscribed the names of the 73 islanders who died in the Civil War.

Winged Victory Monument

Description:

Situated in front of Great Barrington’s town hall, this Civil War memorial displays an 8-foot statue of the Goddess ‘Victory’ atop a golden globe, holding both golden laurel wreath and olive branch, placed on a brownstone column. It was dedicated, in memory of the town's residents who fought for the Union cause, on 1 July, 1876. The monument’s artist was noted sculptor Truman Howe Bartlett, and its design is said to have been inspired by a statue excavated from Pompeii with which Bartlett was familiar. Though there was, in 1912, a call by some locals to replace the representation of Victory with a more conventional Civil War figure, the monument was defended by local resident and Medal of Honor recipient Frederick N. Deland, and was ultimately preserved.

Lynn Soldiers' Monument

Description:

The City of Lynn’s Soldiers’ Monument is notable for the allegorical classicism of its figures, with a Grecian style preferred over the conventional standing soldier of many contemporaneous memorials. Comprised of a trio of bronze figures atop an ovular, granite base, the monument displays a central figure representing the City of Lynn crowning her fallen sons. Leaning on a shield which displays the city’s coat of arms, to her left sits a statue representing Justice, to her right, an allegorical figure of War. The Soldiers’ Monument was dedicated on September 17, 1873 - the eleventh anniversary of the Battle of Antietam - in honour of the 283 Lynn soldiers who gave their lives for the Union cause. A reported 15,000 people were present at the memorial’s unveiling.

Marblehead Soldiers’ Monument

Description:

A granite obelisk standing at 34 feet high, Marblehead’s Soldiers’ Monument was erected in 1876, the same year as the town’s Mugford Monument, and dedicated on the centennial July 4. Although its north-side inscription honours the memory of ‘Our Country’s Defenders’ throughout three wars - the Revolution of 1776, the War of 1812, and the Civil War - the Monument’s east, west, and south sides are reserved for the names of the 138 soldiers who died in the latter conflict. In May 1913, the Soldiers’ Monument was removed from its original location at Green, Mugford and Elm streets, and relocated to what is now known as Memorial Park.

https://mthopebgr.com/

The Second Maine Regiment of Volunteer Infantry Memorial

Description:

The memorial to the Second Maine Regiment of Volunteer Infantry is located at Mount Hope Cemetery just outside of Bangor. The fourteen-foot-high bronze sculpture, mounted on white granite, depicts a faceless angel carrying a wounded soldier and is accompanied by a small stone tablet at its base and a curved stone wall behind. The monument was erected at the bequest of civic-benefactor Colonel Luther H. Pierce, a native of Bangor and lumber baron, who served in the Union Army and the Second Maine Regiment between 1861 and 1868. Pierce also requested the erection of new gate posts and a fence at Mount Hope in remembrance of his comrades. However, these requests were only completed by the 1960s, the monument was designed and created by O. V. Shaffer, a sculptor from Wisconsin, and erected by the Mount Hope Cemetery and Crematory Corporation in 1962. The monument was dedicated in the same year.

https://mthopebgr.com/

Mount Hope Soldiers’ Monument

Description:

Located in the Mount Hope Cemetery, just outside of Bangor, this Soldiers’ Monument was one of the first monuments to be erected in Maine. Erected by the Citizens of Bangor and dedicated to the men of Bangor who served during the war, this monument was consecrated on 17th June 1864. With the dominant engraving facing towards the Penobscot River, this twenty-foot granite monument is composed of a stepped base, a midsection inscribed with a main inscription and the names of fallen Union troops and surmounted by an obelisk. The conception of the monument, and a dedicated lot for civil war veterans, originated in February 1863 with the arrival of the body of Col. Stephen Decatur Carpenter, the first of Bangor’s casualties. Over the course of 1863 The Soldiers Cemetery Corporation was formed and raised $3,489.94 from public subscription to fund the lot and monument. The monument was designed by S. P. Bradbury of Bangor and created by Sanborn & Co. based in East Cambridge, MA. Throughout the war a larger GAR lot was later established.

Confederate Memorial Fountain

Description:

The Confederate Memorial Fountain was commissioned in 1915 by the Winnie Davis Chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy to commemorate confederate civil war soldiers. The fountain was erected in Hill Park in the city of Helena, Montana, and dedicated on September 5th, 1916, making it the only monument to the Confederacy in the Northwestern United States. It consisted of a square stone base with a plinth in the center. On the plinth rested the basin, and out of the basin rose an octagonal prism which was the fountainhead, and also had the inscriptions carved on it. In the wake of the Charleston church shooting in July of 2015, some city officials broached renaming the fountain the “Civil War Memorial Fountain,” but the Lewis & Clark County Heritage Tourism Council argued for its preservation as a historic monument. However, after the white supremacy rally in Charlottesville, Virginia in August of 2017, the fountain was removed in response to general protest, as well as a letter signed by members of the Native American Caucus, the Montana House of Representatives, and the Montana Senate delivered to city officials calling for the removal of the fountain. It was replaced in April of 2020 by the Equity Fountain.

https://www.eastmont206.org/lee

Lee Elementary School

Description:

The Robert E. Lee Elementary School in East Wenatchee, Washington, was so named because, as the district already had a Ulysses S. Grant Elementary School, the school board felt it was only fair to acknowledge those who had migrated from the South, and in remembrance of the Missouri Compromise. When it came time to erect a new school in 1955, the name Robert E. Lee was put forward. In the wake of the Charleston shooting in June of 2015, some community members began to call for the school to be renamed. Initially, the board decided to keep the name, believing it was a valuable history lesson. However by August, the issue had risen again. A contentious debate followed, with many arguing that the school’s name made racism permissible within the community, while others countered that there were more concrete and direct ways of combatting racism that should be tackled instead. Ultimately, it was unanimously voted that the school’s name would be changed simply to “Lee Elementary,” and while many in the community still pushed for the name to be scrapped altogether, it has remained Lee Elementary to this day. The school still stands as it was originally constructed in 1955, a single story brick building with low eaves and blue exposed beam roof.

https://scvpacnw.wordpress.com/jefferson-davis-park/

Jefferson Davis Highway Marker

Description:

In 1913, the Daughters of the Confederacy began a campaign to dedicate a route across the southern United States as the “Jefferson Davis Highway,” a stretch later to include U.S. Route 99. In 1940, with unofficial state approval, the Daughters of the Confederacy erected stone markers at each end of the Washington State portion of U.S. Route 99, designating it the Jefferson Davis Highway. The stones are identical simple rectangular granite prisms, with an engraved dedication on the front. The city of Vancouver removed their marker stone from public land in 1998 and placed it in a cemetery shed. In 2002, the monument was moved to become part of an installation at the Clark County Historical Museum. In 2007, the stone was again moved to the newly instated Washington Davis Park, where it remains to this day. The Blaine, Washington stone also resides in the Jefferson Davis Park, after its removal in 2002 by state officials upon realizing the designation was never official. In March of 2016, the Washington State Legislature renamed U.S. Route 99 the “William P. Stewart Memorial Highway,” in honor of an Black volunteer during the civil war.

Asheville Zebulon Baird Vance Monument

Description:

The monument was built of rusticated granite blocks in the form of an obelisk. The square base and plinth are also granite. It was fashioned after the Washington monument and stands 75 feet tall. Aside from a small Masonic notation the only inscription when constructed was “Vance” inscribed on each side of the plinth. In 1938 the Asheville Chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy added a bronze plaque above the west face inscription. The monument had fallen into disrepair and was restored in 2015. At the June 2015 rededication another bronze plaque was placed on a small sloped granite block in front of the west face. The monument is surrounded by a black iron fence. Within the fence is another sloped granite block with a bronze inscription memorializing the capture of a piece of military equipment in World War I. As of current events, it is now shrouded, and is set for removal in the near future following consistent pressure from activist groups in the area.

Asheville Zebulon Baird Vance Monument

Description:

The monument was built of rusticated granite blocks in the form of an obelisk. The square base and plinth are also granite. It was fashioned after the Washington monument and stands 75 feet tall. Aside from a small Masonic notation the only inscription when constructed was “Vance” inscribed on each side of the plinth. In 1938 the Asheville Chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy added a bronze plaque above the west face inscription. The monument had fallen into disrepair and was restored in 2015. At the June 2015 rededication another bronze plaque was placed on a small sloped granite block in front of the west face. The monument is surrounded by a black iron fence. Within the fence is another sloped granite block with a bronze inscription memorializing the capture of a piece of military equipment in World War I. This marker appears new with the restoration and may have been placed for future use.

City of Leesburg

Description:

The city of Leesburg was established on June 16th, 1866 after gold was discovered at the Leesburg Mine. As most settlers were Southerners, the settlement was named after Confederate war hero general Robert E. Lee. Today, Leesburg remains an unincorporated community, and little remains of its origins. However, the site has been listed on the National Register of Historic Places since 1975.

Bar Harbor Civil War Monument

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Bar Harbor’s Civil War memorial is located in the old village burial grounds adjacent to the St. Saviour’s Episcopal Church and the Bar Harbor Congregational Church on Mt. Desert Street. It is dedicated to the men of Eden (Bar Harbor’s former name) who served during the American Civil War. The memorial was erected by the Town of Eden on November 4, 1897, the cost of the monument amounted to $5,000 dollars and was funded by the town and public subscription. It was designed and created by Cook & Watkins company of Boston, and the granite was supplied by N.H. Higgins of Ellsworth, Maine. The monument is thirty-three feet tall and is surmounted by a private of the Union Army. Each of its sides is engraved with the emblems representing each part of the Union military: the infantry, the artillery, the cavalry, and the artillery.

Soldiers’ Monument Dover-Foxcroft

Description:

The Soldiers’ Monument located in monument Square, Dover-Foxcroft (originally two separate towns), is a twenty-five-foot-high granite monument, surmounted by a sculpture of a Union soldier at parade rest. It is dedicated to the men of Foxcroft who served on behalf of the Union during the American Civil War. The monument was funded and gifted to the town of Foxcroft in 1893 by Mr. Pegleg Washburn, a native of Foxcroft. A second identical monument was given to the town of Abbot, where his wife Sarah is buried. Although too old to serve, Washburn supported the Union during the war and wished to have a permanent memorial for the soldiers of both towns. The monument was made by the stone cutter firm Morse & Bridge of Dexter and dedicated on October 21st, 1893. The accompanying canon was obtained through the C. P. Chandler Post No, 154 G.A.R from a naval yard.

https://scvpacnw.wordpress.com/jefferson-davis-park/

Jefferson Davis Park

Description:

After the Vancouver Jefferson Davis highway marker was removed from public land in 2006, the Pacific Northwest Chapter of the Sons of Confederate Veterans purchased a small plot of land in 2007 to be made into a public park that would permanently house the stone. The stone now sits at the center of the small park, and above it fly three versions of the Confederate flag. The second Jefferson Davis Highway marker stone was later added to the park. The park has met with great pushback over the years, and has been vandalized several times, as protesters assert that the flying of the Confederate flags in so public a place is a blatant display of racism. However, the state maintains that the flags are being flown on private property, and they and the park remain in place.

Fort Rucker

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Lee Memorial Hospital

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Kirby Smith Center

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Fort Benning

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Fort Gordon

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Fort Polk

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Camp Beauregard

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Fort Bragg

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Fort Hood

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Robert E. Lee RECenter

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Fort A.P. Hill

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Fort Lee

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Fort Pickett

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City of Beauregard

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Chilton County

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City of Clanton

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Hale County

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Cleburne County

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Lee County

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Bullock County

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City of Wheeler

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City of Forrest City

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Lee County

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City of Fort Bragg

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Pasco County

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Lee County

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City of Graceville

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Hendry County

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Baker County

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Bradford County

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Cook County

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Wheeler County

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Bartow County

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Jeff Davis County

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Toombs County

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Stephens County

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City of Leesburg

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Lee County

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City of Confederate

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Beauregard Parish

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Jefferson Davis Parish

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City of Stonewall

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Benton County

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Forrest County

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Jefferson Davis County

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City of Stonewall

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Lee County

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Pender County

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Vance County

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Hoke County

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Lee County

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Jackson County

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City of Stonewall

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Lee County

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Hampton County

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City of Kershaw

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Town of North

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Stonewall County

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Reagan County

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City of Breckenridge

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Stephens County

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Terry County

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Hemphill County

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Randall County

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City of Cleburne

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Johnson County

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Foard County

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City of Fort Davis

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Jeff Davis County

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Lee County

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City of Granbury

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Hood County

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City of Hubbard

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Winkler County

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Gregg County

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City of Lubbock

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Lubbock County

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Roberts County

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Ector County

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Gray County

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Reeves County

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Ochiltree County

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Upton County

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City of Robert Lee

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Tom Green County

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Terrell County

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Scurry County

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Sutton County

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City of Stonewall

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Oldham County

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City of Stuart

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City of Wise

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Wheeler Dam

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Confederate Park

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Confederate Park

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Joe Wheeler State Park

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Jeff Davis Peak

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Confederate Park

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Hemming Park

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Lee Square

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Confederate Oak

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Robert E. Lee Creek

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Robert E. Lee Park

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Confederate Park

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Jefferson Davis Lake

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Confederate Dam

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Jeff Davis Creek

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Jeff Davis Peak

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Jeff Lee Park and Pool

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Stephen Elliott Park

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Hampton Park

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Semmes Lake

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Confederate Park

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Confederate Park

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Nathan Bedford Bust

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Confederate Park

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Jefferson Davis Park

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Sam Davis Hanging Site

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Confederate Park

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Cleburne Mural

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Robert E. Lee Park

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Davis Mountains

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Jefferson Davis Park

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John H. Reagan Park

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Jackson Park

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Lee Park

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J.E.B. Stuart Park

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Lake Maury

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Lee Plaza

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Beauregard Street

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Jeff Davis Street

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Robert E. Lee Drive

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Robert E. Lee Drive

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Robert E. Lee Street

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Forrest Drive

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Hood Street

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Jefferson Davis Drive

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Lee Street

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Longstreet Drive

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Morgan Drive

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Stonewall Street

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Confederate Parkway

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Robert E. Lee Drive

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Beauregard Street

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Forrest Street

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Johnston Street

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Polk Street

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Robert E. Lee Street

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Van Dorn Street

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Confederate Circle

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Robert Lee Street

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Stonewall Lane

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Beauregard Street

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Jefferson Davis Avenue

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Lee Road

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Stonewall Circle

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Edmund Pettus Bridge

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Robert Lee Road

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Joe Wheeler Drive

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Old Lee Highway

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Robert E. Lee Street

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Confederate Drive

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Jefferson Davis Road

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Albert Pike Road

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Jeff Davis Street

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Jeff Davis Avenue

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Confederate Street

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Beauregard Drive

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Claiborne Circle

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Confederate Boulevard

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Pickett Drive

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Robert E. Lee Street

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Jeb Stuart Drive

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Robert E. Lee Drive

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General Lee Road

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Forrest Street

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Hood Street

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Lee Street

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Confederate Point Road

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Confederate Street

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General Lee Road

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Robert E. Lee Lane

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Stonewall Jackson Road

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Robert Lee Road

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Robert E. Lee Road

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Ewell Road

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Jeff Davis Drive

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R E Lee Way

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Lee Street

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Confederate Drive

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Jackson Lane

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Robert E. Lee Street

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Wirz Street

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Ashby Street

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Bedford Place

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Cleburne Avenue

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Cleburne Terrace

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Confederate Avenue

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Forrest Avenue

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Forrest Street

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Gordon Place

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Gordon Street

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Hardee Street

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Jackson Street

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Rolling Mill Street

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Wheeler Road

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General Lee Way

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Robert E. Lee Drive

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Confederate Avenue

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Jeff Davis Drive

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Hood Avenue

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Wheeler Drive

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Forrest Road

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Polk Circle

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Robert E. Lee Street

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Shelby Street

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Jeff Davis Road

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Jefferson Davis Road

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Jeff Davis Street

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Jeb Stuart Drive

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Jeff Davis Drive

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Robert E. Lee Parkway

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Ben Hill Street

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Jeff Davis Avenue

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General Lee Road

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Jeff Davis Street

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General Lee Drive

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Jeb Stuart Drive

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Robert E. Lee Drive

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Beauregard Street

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Early Street

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Hampton Street

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Jackson Boulevard

Description:

Johnston Street

Description:

Lee Boulevard

Description:

McLaws Street

Description:

Mosby Street

Description:

Stuart Street

Description:

Wheeler Street

Description:

Bedford Forrest Drive

Description:

Thomas Overby Drive

Description:

Jefferson Davis Drive

Description:

Jeff Davis Road

Description:

General Lee Road

Description:

Robert Toombs Avenue

Description:

Confederate Way

Description:

Jeb Stuart Drive

Description:

Jefferson Davis Road

Description:

General Ross Drive

Description:

General Stuart Drive

Description:

Jefferson Davis Place

Description:

Robert E. Lee Drive

Description:

Jefferson Davis Drive

Description:

Jeff Davis Road

Description:

Robert Lee Road

Description:

Confederate Avenue

Description:

Jeff Davis Street

Description:

Lee Drive

Description:

Jeff Davis Road

Description:

Jefferson Davis Drive

Description:

Beauregard Place

Description:

General Bragg Drive

Description:

General Ewell Drive

Description:

General Polk Drive

Description:

Jeb Stuart Place

Description:

Kirby Smith Drive

Description:

Robert E. Lee Street

Description:

Beauregard Street

Description:

Beauregard Drive

Description:

Jefferson Davis Street

Description:

Jeff Davis Drive

Description:

Beauregard Avenue

Description:

Beauregard Drive

Description:

Beauregard Street

Description:

Jeff Davis Drive

Description:

Robert E. Lee Road

Description:

Jefferson Davis Drive

Description:

Beauregard Drive

Description:

Lee Circle

Description:

Polk Street

Description:

Slidell Street

Description:

Jefferson Davis Drive

Description:

Jeff Davis Avenue

Description:

Jubal Early Court

Description:

Jefferson Davis Drive

Description:

General Lee Drive

Description:

Confederate Drive

Description:

Lee Avenue

Description:

Jeff Davis Drive

Description:

Jeff Davis Parkway

Description:

Robert E Lee Street

Description:

Jefferson Davis Avenue

Description:

Beauregard Street

Description:

Lee Drive

Description:

Confederate Street

Description:

Jeff Davis Road

Description:

Jeff Davis Road

Description:

Robert E. Lee Drive

Description:

Robert E. Lee Drive

Description:

Bedford Forrest Road

Description:

Robert E. Lee Road

Description:

Jeff Davis Road

Description:

Jefferson Davis Drive

Description:

Stonewall Drive

Description:

Jeff Davis Road

Description:

Robert E. Lee Street

Description:

Jeff Davis Avenue

Description:

Robert E. Lee Road

Description:

Jeff Davis School Road

Description:

Anderson Road

Description:

Barron Road

Description:

Beauregard Road

Description:

Bragg Road

Description:

Breckinridge Road

Description:

Cleburne Road

Description:

Early Road

Description:

Ewell Road

Description:

Forrest Road

Description:

Hood Road

Description:

Kirby Smith Road

Description:

Magruder Road

Description:

Pemberton Road

Description:

Pickett Road

Description:

Robert E. Lee Road

Description:

S Van Dorn

Description:

Robert E. Lee Drive

Description:

Jefferson Davis Drive

Description:

Hardee Road

Description:

Imboden Road

Description:

Jeb Stuart Road

Description:

Mosby Road

Description:

Robertson Road

Description:

Wheeler Road

Description:

Hood Point

Description:

Longstreet Drive

Description:

Pemberton Place

Description:

Jeff Davis Road

Description:

Beauregard Street

Description:

Forrest Avenue

Description:

Longstreet Drive

Description:

Beauregard Street

Description:

Breckinridge Street

Description:

Buckner Avenue

Description:

Confederate Avenue

Description:

Ewell Avenue

Description:

Hampton Avenue

Description:

Hood Avenue

Description:

Jeb Stuart Street

Description:

Mosby Drive

Description:

Pemberton Avenue

Description:

Robert E. Lee Drive

Description:

Stewart [sic] Drive

Description:

Stonewall Circle

Description:

Lee Street

Description:

Lee Highway

Description:

Jeff Davis Avenue

Description:

Beauregard Road

Description:

Hill Street

Description:

Jackson Street

Description:

Jefferson Davis Street

Description:

Stonewall Street

Description:

General Lee Lane

Description:

General Lee Avenue

Description:

Bragg Boulevard

Description:

Fort Bragg Road

Description:

General Lee Avenue

Description:

Robert E. Lee Drive

Description:

Jefferson Davis Street

Description:

Robert E. Lee Drive

Description:

Confederate Street

Description:

Hampton Street

Description:

Lee Street

Description:

Beauregard Lane

Description:

Hill Lane

Description:

Pickett Lane

Description:

Stonewall Drive

Description:

Stuart Lane

Description:

Confederate Street

Description:

Beauregard Drive

Description:

Confederate Avenue

Description:

Stonewall Road

Description:

Stuart Street

Description:

Robert E. Lee Drive

Description:

Beauregard Drive

Description:

Pickett Avenue

Description:

Stuart Street

Description:

General Lee Street

Description:

Jackson Street

Description:

Robert E. Lee Drive

Description:

Archer Drive

Description:

Beauregard Drive

Description:

Bedford Forest Drive

Description:

Bragg Drive

Description:

Breckenridge Drive

Description:

Buckner Drive

Description:

Chalmers Drive

Description:

Early Drive

Description:

Ewell Drive

Description:

George Anderson Drive

Description:

Greenhowe Drive

Description:

Hood Drive

Description:

Jeb Stuart Drive

Description:

Joe Wheeler Drive

Description:

John D. Barry Drive

Description:

John S. Mosby Drive

Description:

Johnston Drive

Description:

Kirby Smith Drive

Description:

Pemberton Drive

Description:

Pettigrew Drive

Description:

Pickett Drive

Description:

R.L. Honeycutt Drive

Description:

Robert E. Lee Drive

Description:

Robert Hoke Road

Description:

Robert S Garnett Drive

Description:

Samuel Cooper Drive

Description:

Semmes Drive

Description:

Van Dorn Court

Description:

Confederate Street

Description:

General Lee Avenue

Description:

Robert E Lee Drive

Description:

Stonewall Lane

Description:

Beauregard Court

Description:

Jeb Stuart Drive

Description:

Confederate Lane

Description:

Beauregard Lane

Description:

Bedford Lane

Description:

Shelby Drive

Description:

Beauregard Avenue

Description:

Bedford Forrest Avenue

Description:

Bonham Court

Description:

Jeb Stuart Avenue

Description:

Jackson Street

Description:

Perry Street

Description:

Beauregard Court

Description:

Lee Street

Description:

Robert E Lee Lane

Description:

Hampton Street

Description:

Lee Court

Description:

Lee Street

Description:

Beauregard Street

Description:

Bonham Drive

Description:

Evans Road

Description:

Jeb Stuart Road

Description:

Longstreet Drive

Description:

Robert E Lee Boulevard

Description:

Trapier Drive

Description:

Wade Hampton Drive

Description:

Wallace Drive

Description:

Beauregard Street

Description:

Davis Street

Description:

Forest Street [sic]

Description:

Hampton Avenue

Description:

Jackson Street

Description:

Stewart [sic] Street

Description:

Stonewall Street

Description:

Beauregard Street

Description:

Bonham Road

Description:

Bonham Street

Description:

Bragg Street

Description:

Cheatam [sic] Street

Description:

Cleburne Street

Description:

Confederate Avenue

Description:

Davis Cr

Description:

Dearing Loop

Description:

Drayton Street

Description:

Early Street

Description:

Elliot Street

Description:

Evans Street

Description:

Ewell Road

Description:

Ferguson Street

Description:

Forest St [sic]

Description:

Forney Road

Description:

Garnett Street

Description:

Greene Avenue

Description:

Gregg Street

Description:

Hardee Street

Description:

Hill Street

Description:

Jackson Boulevard

Description:

Longstreet st

Description:

Magruder Avenue

Description:

Pickens Street

Description:

South Bonham Road

Description:

Stuart Street

Description:

Wheeler Street

Description:

Stonewall Drive

Description:

Beauregard Boulevard

Description:

Robert E Lee Road

Description:

Stonewall Drive

Description:

Confederate Street

Description:

Forrest Street

Description:

Stonewall Lane

Description:

Wade Hampton Boulevard

Description:

Bonham Court

Description:

Beauregard Court

Description:

Jackson Street

Description:

Stonewall Street

Description:

Beauregard Drive

Description:

Jackson Street

Description:

Lee Street

Description:

Jackson Street

Description:

Longstreet St

Description:

Beauregard Street

Description:

Confederate Avenue

Description:

Hood Street

Description:

Anderson Lane

Description:

Beauregard Drive

Description:

Bragg Drive

Description:

Breckinridge Lane

Description:

Confederate Drive

Description:

Forrest Drive

Description:

Hill Drive

Description:

Hood Drive

Description:

Johnson Drive

Description:

Lee Drive

Description:

Pickett Drive

Description:

Jefferson Davis Road

Description:

Beauregard Street

Description:

Robert E Lee Street

Description:

Jackson Street

Description:

North Stonewall Street

Description:

Pendleton Street

Description:

Pickens Street

Description:

Bonham Avenue

Description:

Bonham Road

Description:

Stonewall Lane

Description:

Beauregard Court

Description:

Stonewall Drive

Description:

Jeb Stuart Avenue

Description:

Johnston Avenue

Description:

Robert E Lee Avenue

Description:

Stonewall Drive

Description:

Thomas S. Jackson Road

Description:

Bonham Station Road

Description:

General Lee Drive

Description:

Stonewall Jackson Road

Description:

Hampton Street

Description:

Robert E Lee Drive

Description:

Wade Hampton Avenue

Description:

Stonewall Drive

Description:

Jackson Street

Description:

General Forrest Court

Description:

Jefferson Davis Court

Description:

Jefferson Davis Drive

Description:

Robert E Lee Drive

Description:

Robert E. Lee Lane

Description:

Forrest Avenue

Description:

Neuse Street

Description:

General Lee Road

Description:

Jeb Stuart Drive

Description:

Longstreet Drive

Description:

Jeff Davis Drive

Description:

General Forrest Court

Description:

Robert E. Lee Court

Description:

Robert E. Lee Drive

Description:

General JB Hood Drive

Description:

Jeb Stuart Drive

Description:

Jefferson Davis Drive

Description:

Lee Highway

Description:

Robert E. Lee Drive

Description:

Braxton Bragg Drive

Description:

Forrest Street

Description:

Jackson Street

Description:

Lee Street

Description:

Beauregard Drive

Description:

Robert E. Lee Drive

Description:

Sam Davis Avenue

Description:

Bedford Forrest Lane

Description:

Jeff Davis Lane

Description:

General Forrest Drive

Description:

General Palmer Drive

Description:

Jeb Stuart Drive

Description:

Lee Lane

Description:

Longstreet Drive

Description:

Robert E. Lee Lane

Description:

Sam Davis Drive

Description:

Sam Davis Road

Description:

Stonewall Drive

Description:

Beauregard Street

Description:

Gordon Street

Description:

Hill Street

Description:

Hood Street

Description:

Jackson Street

Description:

Johnson Street

Description:

Lee Street

Description:

Taylor Street

Description:

Jeff Davis Avenue

Description:

Robert E Lee Road

Description:

Beauregard Drive

Description:

Jubal Early Lane

Description:

Lee Parkway

Description:

Lee Circle

Description:

Robert E Lee Road

Description:

Stonewall Jackson Road

Description:

Confederate Street

Description:

Stonewall Street

Description:

Stonewall Road

Description:

Dowling Street

Description:

Robert E Lee Road

Description:

Robert Lee Road

Description:

Robert E Lee Road

Description:

Jeff Davis Street

Description:

East Winkler Street

Description:

Confederate Park Road

Description:

Jeb Stuart Drive

Description:

Robert Lee Street

Description:

Confederate Street

Description:

Robert E Lee Road

Description:

Jeff Davis Street

Description:

John Reagan Street

Description:

Stonewall Drive

Description:

Stuart Lane

Description:

Beauregard Court

Description:

Bedford Forrest Drive

Description:

Breckinridge Court

Description:

Confederate Drive

Description:

Pickett Place

Description:

Lee Sreet

Description:

Lee Avenue

Description:

Jeb Stuart Drive

Description:

Jeff Davis Drive

Description:

Stonewall Drive

Description:

Bedford Forrest Lane

Description:

Robert Lee Avenue

Description:

B. F. Terry Boulevard

Description:

Dowling Road

Description:

Beauregard Avenue

Description:

Beauregard Street

Description:

Robert E Lee Street

Description:

Robert Lee Highway

Description:

Robert Lee Street

Description:

Confederate Avenue

Description:

Jeb Stuart Drive

Description:

Jeff Davis Drive

Description:

Robert E. Lee Drive

Description:

Robert E Lee Road

Description:

Beauregard Street

Description:

Bragg Street

Description:

Braxton Place

Description:

Breckinridge Place

Description:

Chambliss Street

Description:

Dearing Street

Description:

Donelson Street

Description:

Early Street

Description:

Floyd Street

Description:

French Street

Description:

Frost Street

Description:

Gordon Street

Description:

Hardee Place

Description:

Hume Avenue

Description:

Imboden Street

Description:

Iverson Street

Description:

Jackson Place

Description:

Janney's Lane

Description:

Jordan Street

Description:

Lee Street

Description:

Maury Lane

Description:

Pegram Street

Description:

Quantrell Avenue

Description:

Reynolds Street

Description:

Rosser Street

Description:

Van Dorn Street

Description:

Wheeler Avenue

Description:

Jeb Stuart Road

Description:

Jeb Stuart Street

Description:

Jubal Early Highway

Description:

A P Hill Boulevard

Description:

Robert E. Lee Drive

Description:

Confederate Ridge Lane

Description:

General Lee Drive

Description:

Farley Street

Description:

General AP Hill Avenue

Description:

General Jackson Avenue

Description:

General Lee Avenue

Description:

General Winder Road

Description:

Jackson Street

Description:

Lee Street

Description:

Mosby Lane

Description:

Pelham Street

Description:

Stuart Street

Description:

Jeb Stuart Highway

Description:

Lee Highway

Description:

Old Lee Highway

Description:

Old Pickett Road

Description:

Pickett Road

Description:

Bragg Street

Description:

Early Street

Description:

Jackson Avenue

Description:

Longstreet Road

Description:

Stuart Road

Description:

Robert E. Lee Drive

Description:

Lee Hill School Drive

Description:

Lee Hill Village Cir

Description:

Robert E. Lee Drive

Description:

Lee Highway

Description:

Early Street

Description:

Lee Avenue

Description:

Mosby Street

Description:

Stonewall Road

Description:

Jeb Stuart Court

Description:

Jeb Stuart Road

Description:

Jefferson Davis Drive

Description:

Lee Davis Road

Description:

Stonewall Middle Drive

Description:

John Mosby Highway

Description:

Lee Highway

Description:

Jeb Stuart Drive

Description:

Robert E. Lee Drive

Description:

Confederate Street

Description:

Early Street

Description:

Lee Highway

Description:

Lee Street

Description:

Stonewall Street

Description:

Stuart Street

Description:

Confederate Avenue

Description:

Robert E. Lee Road

Description:

Jeb Stuart Road

Description:

Jeb Stuart Drive

Description:

Confederate Avenue

Description:

Beauregard Drive

Description:

J.E.B. Stuart Drive

Description:

Confederate Street

Description:

General Hill Drive

Description:

General Jackson Drive

Description:

General Lee Drive

Description:

Hood Drive

Description:

Davis Road

Description:

Pickett Road

Description:

Robert E. Lee Avenue

Description:

William Barksdale Road

Description:

Jubal Early Drive

Description:

Jeff Davis Drive

Description:

Stonewall Jackson Road

Description:

Pickett Road

Description:

Beauregard Boulevard

Description:

Captain Chews Trace

Description:

Lee Way

Description:

Beauregard Street

Description:

Jackson Street

Description:

Lee Street

Description:

General Lee Street

Description:

Robert E Lee Avenue

Description:

Lee High School

Description:

Beauregard High School

Description:

Deshler High School

Description:

Deshler Middle School

Description:

Robert E. Lee School

Description:

Jeff Davis High School

Description:

Davis Magnet School

Description:

Lee Elementary School

Description:

Lee Elementary School

Description:

Lee School

Description:

Forrest High School

Description:

Lee Elementary School

Description:

Fulmore Middle School

Description:

The Allan Facility

Description:

Lee College

Description:

Lee High School

Description:

Lee Elementary School

Description:

Fort Davis AEC School

Description:

Stonewall Elementary

Description:

Lee High School

Description:

Robert Lee High School

Description:

L.E.E. High School

Description:

Hubbard Middle School

Description:

The Campus at Lee

Description:

Lee Davis High School

Description:

Lee Elementary School

Description:

https://www.bowdoin.edu/ ; https://msmt.org/

Bowdoin College Memorial Hall

Description:

Dedicated in 1882, the Bowdoin College’s Memorial Hall (now called the Maine State Music Theatre and Pickard Theatre) was erected by the alumni of Bowdoin College to commemorate the college’s alumni who served during the Civil War. The project began in 1865 and was overseen by Professor William Smyth, and the Bowdoin Alumni Memorial Hall Association was able to raise $83,000 for the construction of the memorial. Designed by Samuel D. Backus and William G. Preston, the structure is in a French gothic style and accompanied with stained glass windows. Initially, the building contained two classrooms and a large lecture hall on the first floor, while the second floor contained a larger hall. By 1955, a donation by Fredrick W. Pickard allowed the building to be converted into a theatre, the work was carried out by the firm McKim, Mead and White. In 2000 the building was renovated and a pavilion, the Wish Theatre, was connected to the building by a glass atrium.

Baldwin County Seal

Description:

Alabama Coat of Arms

Description:

City of Milton Seal

Description:

Mississippi State Flag

Description:

City Seal

Description:

Confederate Flag

Description:

Confederate Flags

Description:

Confederate Flags

Description:

Confederate Monument

Description:

Confederate Monument

Description:

Confederate Monument

Description:

Emma Sansom Monument

Description:

Turkey Town Monument

Description:

Confederate Monument

Description:

Dexter Avenue Monument

Description:

Robert E. Lee Statue

Description:

Confederate Monument

Description:

Dale County Confederate Soldiers Monument

Description:

The Dale County Confederate Soldiers Monument consists of a base with inscriptions and a square shaft, topped with a standing soldier holding a canteen and a musket with a bayonet.

Confederate Monument

Description:

General Joseph Wheeler

Description:

Confederate Monument

Description:

University of Alabama Civil War Monument - UDC Boulder

Description:

A large stone monument with a bronze plaque originally placed in center of antebellum Rotunda and then relocated to south of the Rotunda Plaza in 1939. It commemorated the white university students who served in the Confederacy during the American Civil War. Removed June 8, 2020 (plaque) and June 9, 2020 (boulder/monument).

Fort Smith Confederate Monument

Description:

This monument replaced an earlier shaft, which was destroyed by a tornado in 1898.

Jackson County Confederate Memorial (AR)

Description:

Originally erected in Newport, it was damaged in a storm in May 1973. It was repaired and moved to Jacksonport in November of 1973.

Confederate Bench

Description:

Texas Memorial

Description:

Confederate Troops Memorial (Phoenix, AZ)

Description:

Copper frame in the shape of the state of Arizona filled with large fragments of unrefined copper ore, affixed with an inscribed plaque. Mounted on concrete base featuring three segments of petrified wood and a second inscription. From February 1962 - July 2020, it was located in Wesley Bolin Park, Arizona State Capitol, Phoenix, AZ, traditional land of the Hohokam, O’odham, and Akimel O’odham (Upper Pima).

Confederate Memorial

Description:

Jefferson Davis Father of National Highways Monument

Description:

Originally placed somewhere near Lebec and old 99, it was moved to the Kern County Museum in 1968, where it sat in a garden. In 2020, however, it was moved into storage

Lee-Jackson Bay Memorial, Washington National Cathedral

Description:

Stained glass windows representing episodes in the life of General Robert E. Lee and General Stonewall Jackson, created in their memory.

Confederate Veterans

Description:

Robert E. Lee Monument

Description:

Confederate Monument

Description:

Confederate Monument

Description:

Confederate Memorial

Description:

Confederate Monument

Description:

Confederate Monument

Description:

Confederate Monument

Description:

Confederate Monument

Description:

Confederate Monument

Description:

Confederate Monument

Description:

Gen. Walker Monument

Description:

Peace Monument

Description:

Confederate Monument

Description:

Confederate Soldier

Description:

Robert E. Lee Monument

Description:

Confederate Memorial

Description:

Confederate Memorial

Description:

Confederate Memorial

Description:

Confederate Monument

Description:

Confederate Monument

Description:

Confederate Monument

Description:

Confederate Monument

Description:

Confederate Monument

Description:

Confederate Memorial

Description:

General Felix K. Zollicoffer Monument

Description:

A limestone obelisk commemorating the death of Confederate Gen. Felix K. Zollicoffer, near the spot where he fell at the Battle of Mill Springs.

Confederate Monument

Description:

Confederate Monument

Description:

Confederate Monument

Description:

Fort Butler Memorial

Description:

Robert E. Lee Statue

Description:

Confederate Monument

Description:

Jefferson Davis Monument (New Orleans)

Description:

The statue of Davis was removed, on order from the City, on May 11, 2017

Robert E. Lee Monument

Description:

Confederate Memorial

Description:

Red River Campaign

Description:

Confederate Memorial

Description:

Confederate Memorial

Description:

Jackson and Lee Monument

Description:

The statue was removed on August 16, 2017, but the base remains intact.

Talbot Boys Monument

Description:

Missouri State Guard

Description:

Frenchman's Spring

Description:

Confederate Memorial

Description:

Our Heroes Monument

Description:

Confederate Monument

Description:

Confederate Statue

Description:

Confederate Monument

Description:

Confederate Monument

Description:

Confederate Monument

Description:

Confederate Monument

Description:

Confederate Monument

Description:

Confederate Monument

Description:

Confederate Monument

Description:

Zebulon Vance Obelisk

Description:

Jefferson Davis Plaque

Description:

Robert E. Lee Statue

Description:

Confederate Arsenal

Description:

Jefferson Davis Monument (Fletcher)

Description:

'The memorial is one of a series of large granite mountain boulders, all about the same size but of different shapes that comprise the “Open-Air Westminster Abbey of the South.” Each marker contains a bronze plaque with date of birth and death and a statement about the person’s significance to southern culture or in some cases their relationship to Calvary Episcopal Church. ' - https://docsouth.unc.edu/commland/monument/763/

Confederate Memorial

Description:

The Last Grand Review

Description:

Confederate Monument

Description:

George Davis Statue

Description:

Cornerstone was laid in 1909

Confederate Monument

Description:

Robert E. Lee Bust

Description:

Stonewall Jackson Bust

Description:

Confederate Monument

Description:

Rose Hill

Description:

Confederate Soldiers

Description:

Confederate Monument

Description:

Stand Watie Monument

Description:

Robert E. Lee Monument

Description:

Confederate Soldiers

Description:

Confederate Memorial

Description:

Confederate Monument

Description:

Confederate Monument

Description:

Confederate Monument

Description:

Confederate Soldier

Description:

Confederate Monument

Description:

Our Confederate Dead

Description:

Confederate Monument

Description:

Confederate Memorial

Description:

Confederate Memorial

Description:

Confederate Monument

Description:

Confederate Soldiers

Description:

Confederate Monument

Description:

J. Harvey Mathes

Description:

Confederate Monument

Description:

Confederate Monument

Description:

Freeman's Battery

Description:

Morton's Battery

Description:

Confederate Monument

Description:

Confederate Monument

Description:

Inscription honoring Confederacy at UT Austin

Description:

A carved inscription on a memorial fountain that was removed in 2016

Jefferson Davis Statue (Austin)

Description:

The statue was relocated from the Littlefield Fountain on the campus of the University of Texas at Austin to the Dolph Briscoe Center for American History in Austin, Texas in 2015

John H. Reagan Statue

Description:

Robert E. Lee Statue

Description:

Confederate Soldier

Description:

General Robert E. Lee and Confederate Soldier Statue

Description:

Also known as "Robert E. Lee on Traveller"

Confederate Soldier

Description:

Confederate Heroes

Description:

Confederate Soldier

Description:

Dick Dowling Monument

Description:

Confederate Monument

Description:

John H. Reagan Statue

Description:

Dick Dowling Monument

Description:

Confederate Soldier

Description:

Confederate Monument

Description:

Lee Oak (Tree)

Description:

Confederate Monument

Description:

Confederate Monument

Description:

Confederate Monument

Description:

Turner Ashby Monument

Description:

Confederate Monument

Description:

Confederate Monument

Description:

Confederate Monument

Description:

Confederate Monument

Description:

Jubal Early Monument

Description:

Confederate Monument

Description:

Confederate Monument

Description:

Confederate Monument

Description:

Confederate Monument

Description:

A.P. Hill Monument

Description:

https://www.kark.com/news/national/richmond-removing-confederate-soldiers-and-sailors-statue/#:~:text=The%20Confederate%20Soldiers%20%26%20Sailors%20Monument%20is%20shown,as%20part%20of%20the%20Black%20Lives%20Matter%20reaction.

Richmond Soldiers and Sailors Monument

Description:

Dedicated to Confederate Soldiers and Sailors in Richmond, VA, the monument is a Doric column, standing in the city’s Libby Hill Park. Originally it had a bronze sculpture of a soldier on top, which was removed in 2020. In early 2022, the column was also dismantled and removed.

J.E.B. Stuart Monument

Description:

The statue was removed from its pedestal and placed into storage on July 7, 2020

Jefferson Davis Monument (Richmond)

Description:

This statue of Davis was torn down on June 10, 2020 during the protests over the murder of George Floyd. The statue of Vindicatrix (the personification of Southern womanhood) was removed on July 8, 2020. The rest of the monument is pending removal.

Jefferson Davis Statue

Description:

Robert E. Lee Monument

Description:

Lee Highway Marker

Description:

Robert E. Lee Monument

Description:

Confederate statue

Description:

Confederate Monument

Description:

Confederate Monument

Description:

Confederate Monument

Description:

Confederate Monument

Description:

Confederate Monument

Description:

Confederate Monument

Description:

Confederate Monument

Description:

Confederate Monument

Description:

Confederate Monument

Description:

Confederate Monument

Description:

Confederate Monument

Description:

Confederate Monument

Description:

Confederate Monument

Description:

Confederate Monument

Description:

Confederate Monument

Description:

Confederate Soldier

Description:

Walton County Flag

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Robert E. Lee portrait

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Confederate Monument

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Confederate Monument

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Johnny Reb Monument

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Confederate Monument

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Confederate Monument

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Confederate Flagpole

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Confederate Flag

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Confederate Monument

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Confederate Flag

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Confederate Monument

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Confederate Monument

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Confederate Monument

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Jefferson Davis Bust

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Confederate Monument

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Confederate Monument

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Confederate Monument

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Confederate Monument

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At Rest Arms Monument

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Confederate Monument

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John C. Breckinridge Memorial

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In 2018, the statue was moved to Lexington Cemetery

Confederate Monument

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Confederate Memorial

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Confederate Monument

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Confederate Monument

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Confederate Memorial

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Confederate Monument

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Confederate Monument

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Confederate Monument

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Confederate Flag

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Confederate Monument

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Confederate Monument

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Colonel Rogers Statue

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Confederate Monument

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Confederate Memorial

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Confederate Monument

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Confederate Monument

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Confederate Monument

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Confederate Monument

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Confederate Monument

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Confederate Monument

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Jackson County Confederate Monument (NC)

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In the mid-1990s, the statue was removed, refurbished, and then rededicated on May 11, 1996. In 2021, a new plaque was affixed to the statue covering the bas-relief flag.

Confederate Monument

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Confederate Monument

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Our Confederate Dead

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Confederate Monument

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Confederate Memorials

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Confederate Monument

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Robert E. Lee Monument

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Confederate Monument

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Confederate Monument

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Confederate Monument

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Our Confederate Dead

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Confederate Monument

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Confederate Women

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Confederate Monument

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Confederate Monument

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Confederate Monument

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Call to Arms Monument

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Confederate Monument

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Confederate Monument

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Confederate Monument

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Confederate Monument

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Confederate Monument

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Confederate Monument

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H.B. Granbury Monument

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Confederate Soldier

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Confederate Monument

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Confederate Monument

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Confederate Monument

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Confederate Heroes

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Confederate Monument

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Confederate Monument

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Confederate Monument

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Confederate Monument

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Confederate Monument

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Civil War Monument

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Confederate Monument

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Confederate Monument

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Confederate Monument

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Confederate Monument

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George Morgan Jones Statue

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Statue removed in 2017

Confederate Monument

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Confederate Monument

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Confederate Monument

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Confederate Monument

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Confederate Monument

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Confederate Monument

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Confederate Monument

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J.E.B. Stuart Portrait

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Confederate Monument

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Confederate Monument

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Confederate Monument

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Confederate Monument

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Confederate Monument

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Confederate Monument

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Confederate Monument

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Confederate Monument

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Confederate Monument

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John B. Gordon Statue

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Taylor Home Monument

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Confederate Monument

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Sam Davis Statue

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UDC Anniversary Plaque

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Robert E. Lee Statue

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Stonewall Jackson Bust

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Confederate Monument

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Robert E. Lee Day

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Confederate Flag Day

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Robert E Lee Day

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Jefferson Davis Day

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Robert E. Lee Day

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Robert E. Lee Day

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Robert E Lee Day

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Robert E. Lee Day

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Lee's Birthday

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Robert E Lee Day

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Robert E. Lee Day

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Confederate Heroes Day

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Lee-Jackson Day

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Jefferson Davis Award

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Col. Henry “Harry” Burgwyn Monument

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This granite obelisk stands to commemorate the falling of Colonel Henry ‘Harry’ Burgwyn, Jr. who dies on July 1st 1863 at Gettysburg. He was known as the ‘Boy Colonel of the Confederacy’ and the youngest of the colonel in the Confederate Army at the time of his death. His control of the 26th Regiment of NC troops during the battle led to the death or wounding of 588 men, the highest casualty rate for a single regiment in a single day of battle on either side of the conflict. The monument is located in the historic Oakwood Cemetery in North Carolina’s capital, Raleigh. There are yearly Confederate Memorial held at the monument and it is the cornerstone for Civil War memorial activities in the vicinity.

Loyal Cherokees

Description:

The Loyal Cherokee tablet is a bronze plaque set into the face of a column made of rough native stone. It is engraved with the profile of Will West Long who was a descendant of a Cherokee Confederate Veteran. The opening of the marker was attended by a troop of Boy Scouts, locals and several Native American tribes. It was made to ‘[stress] the need of southern history being perpetuated and eulogized the Indian soldiers of the Confederacy’. This was in response to the men who became part of companies A and B of the 6th NC Regiment, broadly made up of able-bodied Native American men, who served as scouts and home guards along the border with Tennessee. Several Native American members sang both ‘America’ and ‘Beulah Land’ in their native tongues. It is flagged by World War One markers that commemorate fallen Cherokees during that war.

Caldwell County Confederate Monument, Lenoir

Description:

The granite monument consists of a base with an obelisk on top standing 35 ft. tall in total. The north and south sides of the base have inscriptions, one being from the poem "Bivouac Of The Dead” and the other listing the regiments from Caldwell County. On June 3, 1910, the dedication ceremony began at 10am with a short parade that featured “grizzled heroes of the sixties” marching on foot and commanded by their own officers. Its opening was marked by the appearance of Judge Walter Clark, who at age 14 became the youngest Major in the Confederate Army. During the era of monument building in the early decades of the 20th century Clark became one of the most sought out monument dedication orators. He delivered six such speeches, three of which have survived. He was considered the states preeminent Civil War historian.

Caldwell County Confederate Monument, Lenoir

Description:

The granite monument consists of a base with an obelisk on top standing 35 ft. tall in total. The north and south sides of the base have inscriptions, one being from the poem "Bivouac Of The Dead” and the other listing the regiments from Caldwell County. On June 3, 1910, the dedication ceremony began at 10am with a short parade that featured “grizzled heroes of the sixties” marching on foot and commanded by their own officers. Its opening was marked by the appearance of Judge Walter Clark, who at age 14 became the youngest Major in the Confederate Army. During the era of monument building in the early decades of the 20th century Clark became one of the most sought out monument dedication orators. He delivered six such speeches, three of which have survived. He was considered the states preeminent Civil War historian.

Caldwell County Confederate Monument, Lenoir

Description:

The granite monument consists of a base with an obelisk on top standing 35 ft. tall in total. The north and south sides of the base have inscriptions, one being from the poem "Bivouac Of The Dead” and the other listing the regiments from Caldwell County. On June 3, 1910, the dedication ceremony began at 10am with a short parade that featured “grizzled heroes of the sixties” marching on foot and commanded by their own officers. Its opening was marked by the appearance of Judge Walter Clark, who at age 14 became the youngest Major in the Confederate Army. During the era of monument building in the early decades of the 20th century Clark became one of the most sought out monument dedication orators. He delivered six such speeches, three of which have survived. He was considered the states preeminent Civil War historian.

Caldwell County Confederate Monument, Lenoir

Description:

The granite monument consists of a base with an obelisk on top standing 35 ft. tall in total. The north and south sides of the base have inscriptions, one being from the poem "Bivouac Of The Dead” and the other listing the regiments from Caldwell County. On June 3, 1910, the dedication ceremony began at 10am with a short parade that featured “grizzled heroes of the sixties” marching on foot and commanded by their own officers. Its opening was marked by the appearance of Judge Walter Clark, who at age 14 became the youngest Major in the Confederate Army. During the era of monument building in the early decades of the 20th century Clark became one of the most sought out monument dedication orators. He delivered six such speeches, three of which have survived. He was considered the states preeminent Civil War historian.

Caldwell County Confederate Monument, Lenoir

Description:

The granite monument consists of a base with an obelisk on top standing 35 ft. tall in total. The north and south sides of the base have inscriptions, one being from the poem "Bivouac Of The Dead” and the other listing the regiments from Caldwell County. On June 3, 1910, the dedication ceremony began at 10am with a short parade that featured “grizzled heroes of the sixties” marching on foot and commanded by their own officers. Its opening was marked by the appearance of Judge Walter Clark, who at age 14 became the youngest Major in the Confederate Army. During the era of monument building in the early decades of the 20th century Clark became one of the most sought out monument dedication orators. He delivered six such speeches, three of which have survived. He was considered the states preeminent Civil War historian.

Chowan County Confederate Dead, Edenton

Description:

This monument was built to honour the Confederate dead of Chowan County. It consists of a tall white granite shaft with a Confederate Common Soldier standing with his rifle at his waist and pointing forward. In the Civil War, Chowan County contributed men to the Albemarle Artillery, composed of enlisted men from North Carolina's eastern counties. The monument originally stood in the lawn in front of the Old Colonial Courthouse on East King Street. Although just steps from the waterfront, the monument was placed with the soldier's back to the bay as he faced north. Today the monument sits on South Broad Street in a median between the lanes of the street, south of Water Street. It’s bronze material reflects the common story that the Light Artillery of the company was made up of was crafted out of bronze bells, and smelted into weapons.

Rutherford County Confederate Soldiers Monument, Rutherfordton

Description:

Rising nearly twenty-five feet, this monument depicts a marble sculpture of the Confederate Common Soldier, mounted atop a tall tapered column. The uniformed soldier stands at parade rest, holding the barrel of his rifle with both hands. It commemorates the fact that Rutherford County sent some 1,734 men to fight in the Civil War. The county also experienced some destruction, particularly in Rutherfordton, during the Union campaign known as Stoneman's Raid. Its address of welcome involved the speeches of two future Governors to an audience of 6000-7000.

https://www.bridgewaterpubliclibrary.org/

Bridgewater Memorial (Public) Library

Description:

The Library was built as a Civil War Memorial, town museum and library, containing a room with a memorial vestibule which was designed to display war relics. The architects who designed it were considered highly prestigious and designed mansions, churches and academic halls in New England. The exterior is decorated with tablets made out of Tennessee marble on the front face of the building, which list the names of 36 men from Bridgerton who were killed between 1861 and 1865. Located in the town centre and functions as a community hub and working library.

Essex Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument

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: Located in memorial park, a tall figure on an ornate pedestal. Designed by Snow and Amis who were famous for designing statues for cemeteries, it is a similar representation to the archetypal “Soldier at Parade Rest” monument (1867, Maryland). Despite Essex’s strong ship-building industry, the only reference to sailor’s in the monument is in the form of an anchor. There were repeated campaigns for a Civil War memorial in Essex, leading to the Women’s Relief Corps to organize fundraising for the monument. Of the 186 men from Essex who fought in the war, 24 died. They made up a substantial number of those in the 19th, 23rd and 48th Massachusetts Infantry Regiments. The 48th was commanded by Capt. Charles Howes of Essex and contained four companies of Irish immigrants predominantly from Boston, which led to friction with the regiment. Currently due to building works it cannot be seen from the street.

https://www.colby.edu/libraries/

Colby College Lion Monument

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The Weeping Lion statue was originally installed on the second floor of Colby College Memorial Hall, situated on the old campus. The marble statue, and its accompanying plaque, is dedicated to those students and graduates from Colby College who served and died for the Union. The statue is a replica of the Lion of Lucerne, located in Switzerland, which was designed by Bertel Thorvaldsen and dedicated to the Swiss Guard who were massacred in 1792 during the French Revolution. The erection of the college statue in Colby Memorial Hall was overseen and funded by Professor Charles E. Hamlin, and the monument was designed and created by Marin Millmore of Boston. It was dedicated during the commencement of 1871. However, the college campus was moved during the 20th century, and the statue was later moved in 1962 before the destruction of the old campus in 1966. It can now be found in the Miller Library on Mayflower Hill.

https://mthopebgr.com/

Grand Army of the Republic fort

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Located in the G.A.R. lot gifted to the Hannibal Hamlin and B. H. Beal Posts at Mount Hope cemetery, Bangor, the Grand Army of the Republic Fort is accompanied by a naval cannon, a plaque and flagpole. The monument is dedicated to those Union soldiers who fought in the American Civil War, it was erected by patriotic donors in 1907. The monument was rebuilt in 1983, the reconstruction was funded by a bequeathment from Luther H. Peirce, a member of The Second Maine Regiment of Volunteers.

Newburyport Volunteer and Tablets

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The first monument to a common soldier known to have been sculpted by a woman, ‘The Volunteer’ was later used to cast multiple copies across Massachusetts and Mississippi. Kitson’s monument attempted to restore individuality to the soldier by diverging from more conventional representations of the soldier as at parade rest. Instead, the monument is striking in its life-like representation of the Union soldier: his coat is unbuttoned, trousers tucked into his boots and hand in his pocket.

Sharon Volunteer of 1861

Description:

The Volunteer is a copy of Kitson’s sculpture in Newport, but unlike the original, this figure has a mustache and looks slightly older. It is possible that the committee wanted their statue to be unique, whilst basing a design on an existing monument would have been more cost-effective. It was a gift from George Washington Gay and his wife Eunice Lyon Gay. George H. Gay, was mortally wounded at the Battle of Dallas in Georgia on May 25, having enlisted with the 33rd Massachusetts Infantry when he was 18 and a student. The monument is dedicated to George H. Day and all of Sharon’s ‘sons who fell in the Great Civil War 1861-1865’. The left panel of the Sharon Soldier’s monument bears a plaque dedicated to of Deborah Sampson Gannett, the grandmother of G.W. Gay, who was also from Sharon and disguised herself as a man in order to serve in the Revolutionary War.

The Wounded Color Sergeant

Description:

Located in a prominent place on Veteran Memorial Green, near an elementary school, library and town common, this monument was recently refurbished and an inscription was added with the name of Kitson, a prolific female sculptor, funded in part by the League of Women Voters. The monument is dynamic and shows a fallen standard-bearer handing a shattered Union flat to a sergeant who raises it up in his right hand, a rifle in his left.

North Andover Soldier’s Monument

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Locally referred to as the ‘Minuteman’ this monument is based on Kitson’s Newburyport statue of ‘The Volunteer’. The North Andover figure however maintains a different pose to its predecessor, as he appears to be stepping forward with his rifle ready in his arms, rather than casually slung over one shoulder. The monument was repeatedly postponed, till 1912 when it was decided that it should also commemorate soldiers from North Andover who fought in other wars. The monument bears no inscription except for that of Kitson’s name and the Gorham Co. founder’s mark.

Eighth Maine Regiment Memorial

Description:

The Eighth Maine Regiment Memorial was built in 1891 in Peaks Island, in Casco Bay, which is part of the city of Portland, Maine. It initially served as a summer vacation lodge for the Civil War veterans of the Eighth Maine Regiment with the capacity to accommodate annual reunion events. Today, it is managed by descendants of the veterans of the Eighth Maine Regiment and still serves as a lodge as well as a memorial structure, containing a museum and library that honours the Civil War.

North Attleborough Soldiers’ Monument

Description:

Recently restored by the Royalston Arts Foundry, the Soldier Monument is based on Kitson’s sculpture in Newburyport. The sculpture stands atop a square granite base, which rests on two steps and features a soldier marching with his rifle on his right shoulder and left hand in his pocket. The soldier appears youthful and life-like due to his relaxed posture, a characteristic of Kitson’s work. It stands directly opposite the Baptist Church. Instead of the names of those who served in the war the plaques feature patriotic dictums written by Reverend George Osgood, who was a pastor at the Episcopal Church in North Attleborough.

Fort O'Brien Cannon / 'Napoleon'

Description:

Overlooking the Machias River in Washington, Maine, the Fort O’Brien cannon, also known as ‘Napoleon’, was created by the Ames Manufacturing Company of Chicopee, Massachusetts in 1862 and was placed in Fort O’Brien in 1863. During the Civil War, a five-gun battery was installed in Fort O’Brien, even though the fort saw no action. The cannon is made of bronze, weighs 1216 pounds and is capable of firing 12-pound cannonballs which in optimal conditions could reach 1600 yards. Today, this cannon is the only military object left on site.

Ashburnham Soldier's Monument

Description:

The Soldier’s Monument, sculpted by Theo Alice Ruggles Kitson and based on her monument in Newburyport, is a 14 feet statue of a Union soldier marching with his rifle over his right shoulder, and his left hand resting on his waist, which stands atop a square granite base adorned with a bronze star. It is situated directly in front of Jacob H. Fairbanks Memorial, which was dedicated on the same day. It was paid for by Melvin Ohio Adams through funds received from the sale of his Winchester estate to the Town of Ashburnham.

Vicksburg Volunteer - Massachusetts State Memorial

Description:

The Massachusetts State Memorial was the first State memorial to be erected in Vicksburg National Military Park, which now holds over 1, 400 monuments to both Unionist and Confederate soldiers. It is dedicated to the 29th, 35th, and 36th Massachusetts Infantry Regiments that arrived in Vicksburg in June 1863. It is a copy of Kitson’s monument ‘The Volunteer’ in Newburyport which departs from the tradition of representing soldiers at parade rest, instead featuring a soldier with his rifle slung over his right soldier, trousers tucked into his socks and his left hand in his pocket, standing on a 15 ton granite boulder from Massachusetts.. The addresses were made by Major Dwight O. Judd, Major Hodgkins and Lieutenant-General Stephen D. Lee.

Chamberlain Freedom Park

Description:

Chamberlain Freedom Park was dedicated in 1997 to Joshua L. Chamberlain who led a successful defense against the Confederate army on 2nd July 1863 in Gettysburg. Built on a slanting hill, the park imitates Little Round Top, Gettysburg and contains multiple plaques with inscriptions regarding the fight of the 2nd of July, as well as three sculptures; a statue of Joshua Chamberlain, a replica of the 20th Maine Monument that stands in Little Round Top and North to Freedom. The idea for the park started in 1995 when the house of John Holyoke was demolished to make way for a new Penobscot Bridge. Holyoke was a prominent abolitionist, and his house contained an underground shaft linking the house with the Penobscot river. The symbolic tracks installed on the park commemorate the site’s significance as a stop for self-emancipated persons on their way to Canada and to freedom.

20th Maine Monument (Chamberlain Freedom Park)

Description:

The 20th Maine Monument which sits in Chamberlain Freedom Park, Brewer is a replica of the eponymous monument situated in Little Round Top, Gettysburg. The monument, like the one in Gettysburg, commemorates the 386 men of the 20th Maine Volunteers who secured the Union left flank in Little Round Top on the 2nd of July 1863, against the Alabamians. The Brewer monument, dedicated in 1997, unlike its counterpart in Little Round Top, bears no inscription of the men that died in battle. The monument was created to compliment the statue of Joshua L Chamberlain to whom the park is named after, as he led the charge in Gettysburg, for which he was awarded with the Medal of Honor.

20th Maine Monument (Chamberlain Freedom Park)

Description:

The 20th Maine Monument which sits in Chamberlain Freedom Park, Brewer is a replica of the eponymous monument situated in Little Round Top, Gettysburg. The monument, like the one in Gettysburg, commemorates the 386 men of the 20th Maine Volunteers who secured the Union left flank in Little Round Top on the 2nd of July 1863, against the Alabamians. The Brewer monument, dedicated in 1997, unlike its counterpart in Little Round Top, bears no inscription of the men that died in battle. The monument was created to compliment the statue of Joshua L Chamberlain to whom the park is named after, as he led the charge in Gettysburg, for which he was awarded with the Medal of Honor.

North to Freedom (Chamberlain Freedom Park)

Description:

The 20th Maine Monument which sits in Chamberlain Freedom Park, Brewer is a replica of the eponymous monument situated in Little Round Top, Gettysburg. The monument, like the one in Gettysburg, commemorates the 386 men of the 20th Maine Volunteers who secured the Union left flank in Little Round Top on the 2nd of July 1863, against the Alabamians. The Brewer monument, dedicated in 1997, unlike its counterpart in Little Round Top, bears no inscription of the men that died in battle. The monument was created to compliment the statue of Joshua L Chamberlain to whom the park is named after, as he led the charge in Gettysburg, for which he was awarded with the Medal of Honor.

North to Freedom (Chamberlain Freedom Park)

Description:

North to Freedom is a bronze statue depicting a self-emancipated man, sculpted by Glenn and Dianne Hines. The statue was added in 2002 in Chamberlain Freedom Park, five years after the park was built, and it is Maine’s only official monument commemorating the Underground Railway. The figure is portrayed only up to the groin and he is shown to be wearing a torn shirt which is meant to depict the shirt, which was found in the attic of the Holyoke House was demolished. Although the monument is relatively recent, the site on which it is placed is historically significant, as a stone-lined shaft was discovered below the Holyoke House in 1995. The base of the statue is meant to represent that stone-line shaft as the figures seems to be emerging out of the underground tunnel.

Surry, Courthouse Common Soldier

Description:

Dedicated in August 1910, the Confederate Monument in front of the Surry County Courthouse was erected in the memory of Surry’s Confederate soldiers. The monument features a bronze figure of a Confederate cavalryman upon a stone base engraved with the Confederate battle flag with an inscription. The inscription reads “Our heroes 1861-1865, to the Confederate soldiers of Surry County, that we through life may not forget to love the thin gray line, erected by the Confederate Memorial Association of Surry County A.D. 1909.” Following a unanimous vote amongst the Surry County Board of Supervisors in 2020, the monument will be relocated in the near future.

Isle of Wight, Courthouse Common Soldier

Description:

Affectionately nicknamed “Johnny Reb” by locals, the Confederate Soldiers’ monument at the Isle of Wight Courthouse commemorates the county’s fallen Confederate soldiers. The monument is made entirely from granite and depicts a private Confederate soldier standing at parade rest atop a plinth, base, six-sided dado, and shaft. Inscriptions on the six-sided dado feature Confederate symbols and quotes from Father Abram J. Ryan’s poem “C.SA. Heroes” and Robert E. Lee. Dedicated by the United Daughters of the Confederacy in 1905, this monument was removed by unanimous vote, dismantled, and relocated to a private citizen’s farm in Isle of Wight in 2021.

Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Monument (Manhattan)

Description:

Located in Manhattan’s Riverside Park, this circular temple was erected in 1902 in memory of the Soldiers’ and Sailors’ who fought for the Union during the Civil War. It is an example of the neoclassical style in architecture, a popular choice for artists associated with the City Beautiful movement. Two plinths positioned to east and west of the temple’s approach list the names of prominent Union Generals and battles. It remains a significant site for military ceremony.

Accomack County Confederate Monument

Description:

The Accomack County Confederate Monument, erected in the town of Parksley, honors the Confederate volunteers from Accomack and Northampton counties. This standing soldier statue has an interesting history, as it was a product of intercounty disputes. The original campaign for the monument was initiated by a local newspaper in 1898 and called for the monument's erection at the county seat in Accomac. Nearby Parksley, however, advocated to house the monument and eventually secured their bid. The monument, a private soldier standing at parade rest surmounting a plinth, still stands in Parklsey. Recent efforts to remove the statue revealed that the town does not, and has never, owned the monument.

Eastville Courthouse Common Soldier

Description:

The common soldier Confederate monument in Eastville is one of two courthouse monuments on the Eastern Shore of Virginia. The statue features a private soldier standing at parade rest surmounting a plinth, base, dado, and column. Unusually, when conceptualizing the monument in 1913, county residents opted to dismantle, move, and reconstruct the county courthouse to accommodate the monument. It was then erected on “Eastville's Historic Court Green” in front of the rebuilt courthouse in 1914. This monument is similar to the one at Parksley, as they share the same sponsor and pay tribute to Confederate soldiers in both counties. Following a 3-1 vote by county supervisors, the statue was dismantled and moved to storage on August 26, 2021.

Sojourner Truth Memorial Statue

Description:

The African American Heritage Trail begins at the Sojourner Truth Memorial Statue at the corner of Park and Pine Streets. Just a few doors down from her house at 35 Park Street the statue was dedicated in 2002 after ten years of organizing and fundraising.. The site for the Sojourner Truth memorial statue is a former small city park at the corner of Pine and Park Streets in Florence. The city donated the site for the statue in November 2001. The idea for a memorial statue that would honor Sojourner Truth was the first project of the Sojourner Truth Memorial Statue Committee, and became a reality through local fundraising.

https://sojournertruthmemorial.org/about-us/memorial-statue/ , https://africanamericantrailproject.tufts.edu/

Sojourner Truth Memorial Statue

Description:

The African American Heritage Trail begins at the Sojourner Truth Memorial Statue at the corner of Park and Pine Streets. Just a few doors down from her house at 35 Park Street the statue was dedicated in 2002 after ten years of organizing and fundraising.. The site for the Sojourner Truth memorial statue is a former small city park at the corner of Pine and Park Streets in Florence. The city donated the site for the statue in November 2001. The idea for a memorial statue that would honor Sojourner Truth was the first project of the Sojourner Truth Memorial Statue Committee, and became a reality through local fundraising.

Granby Plaques

Description:

Grandy in Hampshire County has a monument to its Civil War soldiers, as well as two Spanish-American War veterans: a pair pf plaques listing the names of the fallen soldiers. Dedicated on Memorial Day, May 31st, 1909 and presented to the town by committee chair Elliot J. Aldrich, the plaques serve as a reminder of the dedication these soldiers had to their country. Not a lot is known about the plaques or their creation, but they still represent the strong will of the town to keep the memories of their ancestors alive.

https://macivilwarmonuments.com/2017/08/03/granby/

Granby Plaques

Description:

Grandy in Hampshire County has a monument to its Civil War soldiers, as well as two Spanish-American War veterans: a pair pf plaques listing the names of the fallen soldiers. Dedicated on Memorial Day, May 31st, 1909 and presented to the town by committee chair Elliot J. Aldrich, the plaques serve as a reminder of the dedication these soldiers had to their country. Not a lot is known about the plaques or their creation, but they still represent the strong will of the town to keep the memories of their ancestors alive.

The Williams College Soldiers Monuments

Description:

The Soldier’s Monument honoring Williams students and alumni who fought during the US Civil War is of note as it is one of the earliest memorials to veterans and the war dead still extant on college and university grounds, as most such monuments were not commissioned until the early twentieth century. This was commissioned by the Society of Alumni of Williams College and dedicated in 1868. The monument was temporarily taken down in 1925 and was rededicated to the residents of Williamstown in 1929. It originally had a gothic pedestal but is now mounted on a more modern geometric form.

https://artmuseum.williams.edu/collection/public-art/the-soldiers-monument/ , https://www.waymarking.com/waymarks/WMH1E5_The_Soldiers_Monument_Williamstown_MA , https://macivilwarmonuments.com/2020/07/03/williamstown/ , https://www.berkshireeagle.com/archives/phyllis-mcguire-williams-college-campus-features-art-works-for-all-to-see/article_628439d9-7bfd-5b56-8ea2-4fe41f036bf5.html

The Williams College Soldiers Monument

Description:

The Soldier’s Monument honoring Williams students and alumni who fought during the US Civil War is of note as it is one of the earliest memorials to veterans and the war dead still extant on college and university grounds, as most such monuments were not commissioned until the early twentieth century. This was commissioned by the Society of Alumni of Williams College and dedicated in 1868. The monument was temporarily taken down in 1925 and was rededicated to the residents of Williamstown in 1929. It originally had a gothic pedestal but is now mounted on a more modern geometric form.

The Plainville Soldiers' Monument

Description:

Made possible through the efforts of the local Women’s Relief Corps Post 74, the Plainville Soldiers’ Monument serves as a dedication to the efforts of the soldiers and veterans in the organization known as the Grand Army of the Republic. It was erected to promote memorialization and to petition for pensions for Civil War nurses. The praise, rather dated in its framing of gender roles, nonetheless is significant in acknowledging the important and ever-expanding work done by women during and after the war. Although the image and inscription only mention men, this monument was a feat succeeded by and for the women of the Civil War.

https://macivilwarmonuments.com/2021/08/28/plainville/ , https://www.facebook.com/macivilwarmonuments/posts/plainville-norfolk-county-was-part-of-wrentham-when-this-monument-was-dedicated-/3852122151554329/ , https://collections.si.edu/search/detail/edanmdm:siris_ari_342494?q=record_ID%3Asiris_ari_342494&record=1&hlterm=record_ID%3Asiris_ari_342494

The Plainville Soldiers' Monument

Description:

Made possible through the efforts of the local Women’s Relief Corps Post 74, the Plainville Soldiers’ Monument serves as a dedication to the efforts of the soldiers and veterans in the organization known as the Grand Army of the Republic. It was erected to promote memorialization and to petition for pensions for Civil War nurses. The praise, rather dated in its framing of gender roles, nonetheless is significant in acknowledging the important and ever-expanding work done by women during and after the war. Although the image and inscription only mention men, this monument was a feat succeeded by and for the women of the Civil War.

The Belchertown Soldiers' Memorial

Description:

On the Belchertown Town Common there is a tall monument which is topped with a statue of a Civil War soldier. It is dedicated to Belchertown Civil War veterans and also to those who fought in any colonial or United States war. A highly decorated zinc shaft rests on a granite base. The shaft is topped with a statue of a Civil War soldier. The shaft and base is about 26' high and the figure of a Civil War soldier is about 6' high. The statue and shaft was cast in zinc by the Monumental Bronze Company in 1884. The monument, whose sculptor is unknown, was dedicated on September 15, 1885.

https://macivilwarmonuments.com/2020/01/12/belchertown/ , https://www.massmilitarymonuments.com/Belchertown-Mass.php , http://www.royalstonartsfoundry.com/belchertown.html , https://www.belchertown.org/residents/town_history/index.php , https://books.googleusercontent.com/books/content?req=AKW5Qac8BiMe7sMLY2U8rs59ay_t4LwAO62jmOHmXqWsbDaZOFqTvrM-cQgaOmDBRlFlAnaQqh8cREawRPvBHd9gjpYUDHbUBox68TzmzHIZdoTTta3yfu4bAC8ijdefP2D75WRqIS70TMpQaiU30_Gxgu2cE3nqDX8mlwwWMfamvFNuVYEsR4B_rX79Lty3j2RXlVeWOo0KAOPBeevL6QnqUWaDtKcqENgtH2Nty_UvfmM1XNkFfqa_sR1nJVfDam9SBgnOCv4S4439wuuEOd6mr61A0KUeWnBT1GnTgIxlURla1P5c85I

The Belchertown Soldiers' Monument

Description:

On the Belchertown Town Common there is a tall monument which is topped with a statue of a Civil War soldier. It is dedicated to Belchertown Civil War veterans and also to those who fought in any colonial or United States war. A highly decorated zinc shaft rests on a granite base. The shaft is topped with a statue of a Civil War soldier. The shaft and base is about 26' high and the figure of a Civil War soldier is about 6' high. The statue and shaft was cast in zinc by the Monumental Bronze Company in 1884. The monument, whose sculptor is unknown, was dedicated on September 15, 1885.

Northampton Memorial Hall

Description:

Built in 1874 by Cincinnati architect James W. McLaughlin, the Northampton Memorial Hall is the only example on Main Street of Post Civil War General Grant style architecture. The building not only serves as a memorial site, but also as a public library and archives center. The Hall was erected by the Young Men’s Institute and cost $77,249.79 raised through donations and public funds. In 1888 the entry of the Memorial Hall was adorned with a statue of a Union soldier and sailor collectively known as “Northampton Remembers.” Alongside them, tablets featuring the names of the 90 men from Northampton who fought for the Union and died during the war was added.

Franklin Memorial Park Common Soldier

Description:

Marking the semi-centennial of the Civil War, the Franklin Memorial Park common soldier honors Franklin’s Confederate dead. This marble monument features a private soldier standing at parade rest surmounting a granite plinth, base, dado, and shaft. As a plaque near the monument relays, the statue and the park were gifted to Franklin in 1946 by the children of Mr. and Mrs. James L. Camp. James L. Camp was the former chairman and president of the Camp Brothers’ lumber mill, and later paper mill, the company which helped Franklin to prosper in the twentieth century. While originally erected in 1911, the statue has been moved several times. Its position in Franklin’s Memorial Park was only really secured 35 years after its construction, and its presence there is still being challenged today. As of Summer 2021, the monument was removed and re-erected in the Poplar Springs Cemetery half a mile from the Memorial Park.

Sussex County Confederate Monument

Description:

On the occasion of the Civil War semi-centennial, Sussex County sought a way of honoring their Confederate soldiers and the cause for which they fought. The Sussex Confederate Monument was erected by the Sussex United Daughters of the Confederacy in 1912 to serve this aim and faces south towards the county courthouse built in 1828. Created by McNeel Marble Works, the marble monument consists of a private soldier standing at parade rest surmounting a plinth, base, dado, and shaft. The statue’s inscription states: “THE PRINCIPLES FOR WHICH THEY FOUGHT LIVE ETERNALLY” and details a list of companies organized from Sussex County. While there have been no documented efforts to remove or relocate the monument, four marble cannon balls originally at the corners of the base have been removed.

https://www.town.dartmouth.ma.us/sites/g/files/vyhlif466/f/news/newsletter_sep_2014.pdf

Private David Gifford Memorial Statue

Description:

The memorial to Private David Lewis Gifford is a life-size statue of a local war hero and medal of honor recipient, best known for his daring rescue expedition to save troops on the stranded union steamer ship, USS Boston. The statue depicts Gifford crouched behind a boulder with a rifle in hand, in a pose meant to represent him fighting in open skirmish order. Located on the campus of Dartmouth Middle School, the statue is right at eye-level with the children who come into contact with it on a daily basis. The statue was created through a collaboration between the Dartmouth Veterans Memorial Park Committee and the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth Sculpture Program, designed by sculptor Johnathan Pellitteri. It was erected in 2004, and the middle school celebrated the statue’s dedication with a living history encampment in which participants dressed in Civil War era costume.

http://fairhavenvillagemilitia.blogspot.com/p/our-history.html

Donald R. Bernard Marker

Description:

In 1993, this bronze plaque was affixed to the side of an old powder magazine in Fort Phoenix State Reservation Park in Fairhaven, MA. The plaque commemorates Donald R. Bernard, a man who was significant to the town for having led Civil and Revolutionary War reenactments at Fort Phoenix. His legacy continues today with the Fairhaven Village Militia, who run living history encampments at Fort Phoenix. Bernard was a local historian and Fairhaven’s fire chief, the plaque was dedicated after his death and the reenactment group that he led, called the Fourth Old Dartmouth Militia, fired a salute at the ceremony in his honor. Local politicians spoke at the ceremony, including state rep. Bill Strauss, who claimed that Bernard’s reenactments made people more aware of the location’s history. The dedication ceremony was recorded and broadcast on local television.

New Bedford Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument

Description:

On July 4th, 1866, this tall, obelisk-shaped, stone monument was dedicated to the soldiers from New Bedford who died in the Civil War. The monument is located in the center of Clasky Common Park; a simple, minimalistic design with an eagle at the pinnacle of the obelisk. No particular soldier is named on the monument, but the South side is engraved with the word “Army” and the North with “Navy.” This monument is somewhat atypical in that it calls the Civil War a “struggle with slavery and treason”, explicitly referring to slavery as a main cause of the war. The monument was funded by the city, with money paid to George Meacham. Currently, the monument is surrounded by a tall, iron fence in order to protect it from vandalism. The town’s annual memorial day ceremony takes place in the park in front of the monument.

Mansfield Memorial Library

Description:

Built on a rubble foundation with wooden walls, the Mansfield Memorial Library is a Victorian Gothic style building in Bristol County, MA. The land for the building was donated by Elizabeth F. Noble in 1898 and construction began in 1899. The building was conceived to serve a dual-function as both a public library and memorial to Civil War soldiers. The idea for constructing this building originated with Henry H. Fairbanks, the Quartermaster of the John Rogers Post of the Grand Army of the Republic. Representatives of the G.A.R. were present on the day of dedication and took part in a memorial procession to the site of the building, along with mounted police. The building currently serves to hold the offices of the Mansfield School Department.

Civil War's First Black Regiment Marker

Description:

This historical marker is located at the site of the 54th Massachusetts Infantry Plaza, which was dedicated to the African-American New Bedford soldiers who served in the war in February 1999. The marker was erected by the National Park Service as a part of the New Bedford Whaling National Historical Park, and marks the site of the first office to recruit African-American soldiers during the Civil War. 120 men enlisted in the building, and the first regiment of black soldiers to fight in the Civil War was formed. There is also a colorful mural nearby with scenes depicting the regiments’ participation in the Civil War, in contrast with the black-and-white photographs displayed on the historical marker. The building no longer exists, but in its place is a small, round, urban plaza with a fountain in the center. There are plans for a prospective monument on the site.

Bland County Confederate Monument

Description:

A lone soldier made of marble stands outside Bland County Courthouse in parade rest atop a granite plinth. Erected in August 1911 by the United Daughters of the Confederacy, remains in its original position. The inscription acknowledges the denial of victory to Confederate troops, whilst still noting that they have been “crowned” with “glorious immortality”. This statue's role in that immortality persists, with Bland County Historical Society rededicating the monument in 2011.

Smyth County Confederate Monument

Description:

A granite soldier stands at parade rest atop a plinth outside Marion Courthouse. It was produced by Charles M. Walsh at a cost of $1,100, and unveiled on July 4, 1903, to a crowd of 10,000, with dedicatory addresses from Robert E. Lee, Jr. and John W. Daniel. The monument remains in its original position, and became a location for counter protests during the BLM protests in Summer 2020, with armed locals vowing to defend the monument. 

Abingdon Confederate Soldier Monument

Description:

A bronze soldier, with musket drawn and pointed forward, stands atop a granite plinth. On the base, there are two bronze relief panels, each depicting a lone woman, one holding the shield of Virginia, the other a Confederate flag. The statue, designed by Frederick W. Sievers, was dedicated on 3 June 1908 in the presence of a large crowd of approximately 5,000. It was gifted by the William E. Jones Camp of Confederate Veterans of Abingdon to the Daughters of the Confederacy, who took on the responsibility of maintaining the statue. In Summer 2020, a petition to remove the monument was started, but as of October 2021 the monument remains outside the courthouse.

Carroll County Confederate Monument

Description:

Cast in white bronze, a lone soldier stands in parade rest atop a plinth which is decorated with a bas-relief of Robert E. Lee. The monument, now located outside Carroll County Courthouse, was erected in 1907. It was originally situated in the middle of Main Street but was relocated to its current location in 1930 due to the widening of Main Street. Having deteriorated over the years, the monument was restored with funds from the Sons of Confederate Veterans Jubal Early Camp #1691. It was re-erected on February 28, 2007 and rededicated on April 28, 2007.

Grand Army of the Republic Memorial Woods Plaque

Description:

The Grand Army of the Republic Memorial Woods Plaque honors the sacrifices of Union soldiers and Veterans from Illinois. Located at the entrance to the General Army of the Republic (G.A.R) Woods, the plaque sits before an American flag and adjacent to a descriptive sign. The monument was dedicated and funded by the Past President's Club of the Daughters of the Union Veterans of the Civil War in 1930. At the bottom of this metal plaque, the inscription reads: “Greater love hath no man than this, that a man lay down his life for his friend.”- St. John XV:XII. This quote highlights the importance of religion, specifically Christianity, in memorializing Union veterans and their sacrifices.

Statue of Richard J. Oglesby

Description:

Dedicated in 1919, this statue honors Civil War general and former governor Richard Oglesby. Located in Lincoln (Abraham) Park, the ten-foot monument consists of a bronze statue on a granite pedestal. Despite serving in the 8th Illinois Infantry Regiment and being appointed Major General by President Lincoln, artist Leonard Crunelle chose to portray Oglesby in a humanist manner. The decision to honor his political achievements over his military service may stem from the statue's funders, John Barton Payne, J.S. Runnels, John W. Bunn, L.C. LaForce, and Martin B. Bailey, who were five prominent Chicagoans and politicians. Following a wave of graffiti and monument defacement in the 1990s, the monument became a focal point for debates about monument preservation and appreciation.

Newburyport Civil War Statue, Atkinson Common - Newburyport, MA

Description:

Civil war statue in Atkinson Commons.

John Alexander Logan Monument

Description:

Placed atop a grassy mound in Chicago’s Grant Park, the John A. Logan Monument honors the life and service of Civil War Union general and Illinois politician John Alexander Logan. In his lifetime, John A. Logan served as a commander and general in the Union Army, headed the veteran organization the Grand Army of the Republic. He also led the movement for establishing a national Memorial Day. Prompted by Logan’s death in 1886, this bronze equestrian statue was conceptualized by Chicago’s South Park Commissioners, funded by the Illinois legislature, and created by famed sculptors Augustus Saint-Gaudens and Alexander Phimister Proctor. While he is honoured in this monument for his respected political and Civil War Union service, Logan was openly racist and advocated for legislation directed towards halting black migration and settlement in Illinois.

General Philip Henry Sheridan Monument

Description:

The General Philip Henry Sheridan Monument honors the service of military leader and Union Army hero Philip Henry Sheridan. Located in Lincoln (Abraham) Park, the bronze equestrian statue was commissioned by the Philip Sheridan Monument Association and produced by famed artist Gutzon Borglum. While typically honored for his bravery in the Civil War and efforts during Chicago’s 1871 Great Fire, Sheridan remains a controversial figure. He employed brutal scorched earth tactics against Native Americans and allowed Bison poaching, which nearly led to their species’ extermination. Recently, public awareness of Sheridan’s iniquitous past has led to the monument’s defacement using graffiti.

Ulysses S. Grant Monument

Description:

Perched atop a granite pedestal and archway, the Ulysses S. Grant Monument in Chicago honors the service of famed Civil War general and U.S. President Ulysses S. Grant. The monument was commissioned shortly after Grant’s death, fundraised by prominent Chicagoans, and designed by Italian sculptor Louis Rebisso. Located in Lincoln Park, this bronze equestrian statue represents Grant foremost as a soldier and military leader who led the Union Army to victory. Drawing funds from over 100,000 donors and dedication day crowds of over 200,000 people, this 60 foot tall monument is a fixture of Chicago’s monument landscape. Despite this, recent controversy over commemoration has prompted Chicago’s Mayor, Lori Lightfoot, to place this statue ‘under review’ for possible removal.

The Chicago Board of Trade Battery Monument

Description:

Tucked away amidst the gravestones in the Rosehill Cemetery, you will find the Chicago Board of Trade Battery Monument. This simple block of stone honors the sacrifice of soldiers recruited from the Chicago Board of Trade, the oldest commodity exchange organization in the United States. The battery is noted for its quick assembly, and it is estimated that the group had organized within forty-eight hours. To honor the battery’s fallen soldiers, the Board raised $10,000 by subscription and began plans as early as 1869. Despite this, the monument did not materialize until 1901. The moment’s inscription details the battery’s active service from 1862-1865 in which they marched a total of 5268 miles.

Washington County Confederate Soldier Monument

Description:

A bronze soldier, with musket drawn and pointed forward, stands atop a granite plinth. On the base, there are two bronze relief panels, each depicting a lone woman, one holding the shield of Virginia, the other a Confederate flag. The statue, designed by Frederick W. Sievers, was dedicated on 3 June 1908 in the presence of a large crowd of approximately 5,000. It was gifted by the William E. Jones Camp of Confederate Veterans of Abingdon to the Daughters of the Confederacy, who took on the responsibility of maintaining the statue. In Summer 2020, a petition to remove the monument was started, but as of October 2021 the monument remains outside the courthouse.

https://aquiachurch.org

Confederate Sodiers of Stafford Plaque

Description:

This plaque is one of the memorial plaques on the walls of the historic Aquia Episcopal Church in Stafford, VA. It was placed by the Stafford Rangers chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy in 1933 to memorialize the Confederate soldiers of Stafford. It is simultaneously dedicated to Eva E. Bell, the founder of that chapter of the UDC. This plaque is accompanied by another plaque dedicated to the soldiers from Stafford who died in the world wars, which was also placed by the UDC around the same time, as well as a memorial gate in front of the church dedicated to all Stafford soldiers. Both Union and Confederate soldiers camped outside of Aquia church at different times in the 1860s, and both sides left still-visible graffiti on the church. Unknown Union soldiers were buried there during the war and later moved. The plaque depicts twin furled confederate flags over the inscription.

Returned Soldier

Description:

Benjamin Fitch commissioned Larkin Meade Jr. to replicate a classical sculpture seen by Fitch in Italy to honour Connecticut Veterans and their families. The statue features an orphan sitting on the knee of a Union soldier describing her father’s death in battle, a fitting narrative as the statue stood on the grounds of Fitch’s Home for Soldiers and Orphans in Darien, Connecticut. Following the home’s closure in 1940, the Returned Soldier was relocated to the state’s first cemetery for veterans, Spring Grove Cemetery. After the monument’s restoration in 1985, it was again relocated to the Veterans Home and Hospital in Rocky Hill, where it stands today. A replica of the monument can also be found in the Chrysler Museum of Art in Virginia.

Windsor Locks Memorial Hall

Description:

Funded by Charles E. Chaffee, the Windsor Locks Memorial Hall was erected as the gathering place for the Grand Army of the Republic’s Post No.67, an organization for Union veterans. The group’s official name was the JH Converse Post, dedicated to fallen soldier Joseph H. Converse. When local deacon Jabez H. Hayden sold the land to the GAR, he included a clause stating the land must be used as a soldier’s memorial forever or turned over to the town’s orthodox congregational church. This clause has facilitated the continued preservation and use of the building as a meeting hall for veterans today. On the last Sunday of each month, guided tours are offered to allow exploration of the building and its history.

Forlorn Soldier

Description:

The Forlorn Soldier is a deteriorated Union soldier statue with his rifle, hands, and lower face missing. The statue was completed by James G. Batterson’s stone yard and monument business. Batterson is also known for co-designing the Connecticut State Capitol and establishing Travelers Insurance. When Batterson sold the stone yard to the Kelly Brothers in 1895, the soldier was left behind and placed at Charter Oak Avenue. In 1968, the statue was moved to Airport Road in Hartford before reaching its current location at the Connecticut State Capitol in 2013. The monument’s restoration and relocation to the Capitol were funded by the Kelly family and Travelers Foundation. The statue’s original purpose remains a mystery, but it is rumored that the statue was rejected as a monument because of the feet positioning.

Banning and Rowe Monument

Description:

The Banning and Rowe Monument in East Hartland Cemetery memorializes John F. Banning and Rodolphus D. Rowe, brother-in-laws from Hartland who enlisted in the 16th Connecticut Infantry. In Plymouth, South Carolina, both men were taken as POWs to Andersonville and died in 1864. While neither Banning nor Rowe are buried in Hartland, the obelisk is a reminder of their service and ties to the town. The obelisk’s Banning side includes a shield and crossed bayonets carving, while Rowe’s side features an eagle. Much is unknown about the statue’s conception and the creator; however, Emily Lucretia Banning Rowe, Rowe’s widow and Banning’s sister, may have played a role in erecting the monument due to her relation to both men and the last line of Rowe’s inscription characterizing him as a “beloved husband.”

Petersburg Express

Description:

"Also known as the Dictator, the Petersburg Express mortar monument honours the First Connecticut Heavy Artillery Unit members. The unit used the mortar during the Siege of Petersburg from 1864-65. Weighing in at 7.7 tons, the mortar had to be mounted on a railway car to be used by soldiers. In 1896, the Petersburg Express was brought from Fort Monroe, Virginia, where it was left after the war, to Connecticut to be mounted on a granite pedestal subsequently. In 1958 the mortar’s authenticity as the Petersburg Express was called into question by a newspaper in Oneonta, New York, claiming to have the real Petersburg Express within the city. Still today, some historians question the mortar’s authenticity as the mortar used at the Siege of Petersburg.

Kensington Soldier’s Monument

Description:

The Kensington Soldier’s Monument honors the individuals from Kensington, Connecticut, who died during the Civil War. Dedicated in the midst of war in 1863, the monument stands as the state’s first Civil War monument. The monument is located outside of the Kensington Congregational Church and was designed by parish member Nelson Augustus Moore. Both parish and community members raised the funds for the obelisk's conception. A Civil War cannon was placed near the monument to celebrate its 50th anniversary in 1913. In 2013, the monument was recognized as the oldest permanent Civil War Monument in the US by the National Register of Historic Places. However, this attribution has since been removed and granted to The Hazen Brigade Monument in Tennessee.

The Joseph Roswell Hawley Medallion

Description:

Located under the Connecticut State Capitol’s north portico, the Joseph Roswell Hawley Medallion honors Joseph Hawley, the first volunteer from Connecticut to enlist in the Union Army. After the war, Hawley was elected Governor of Connecticut and later represented the state in both the House of Representatives and Senate. Following his death in 1905, the Connecticut legislature commissioned a memorial to Hawley on Capitol grounds, allocating 1,500 dollars for the monument. The bronze medallion was designed by Herbert Adams, who depicts Hawley in profile and military dress. The monument was dedicated in 1914 in a ceremony attended by 125 soldiers who served under Hawley during the Civil War. The medallion faces a similarly rendered memorial to politician Orville Platt that was dedicated on the same day as the Hawley memorial.

https://www.nps.gov/frsp/learn/historyculture/jds.htm

Stonewall Jackson Death Site

Description:

This is the location where the Confederate General “Stonewall” Jackson, having been accidentally injured by his own men, succumbed to pneumonia and died in 1863. At the time, it was an office building belonging to the Thomas Chandler Plantation. The site came under the ownership of the Potomac Railroad and was opened to the public in the 20s as a “shrine” to Stonewall Jackson. It was sold to the National Park Service in 1937. All the other plantation buildings were dismantled but this one was preserved and restored by a group of women including the daughter of Thomas Chandler. The original clock, blanket, and bed which he died in still remain in place. Period-appropriate items have been placed in the rooms to evoke the time and place of his death. There are informational signs at the site describing the events that took place there. There is also a stone marker dedicated to Jackson outside the building, placed there in 1903 by a friend of Jackson. In 2019, the name of the site was changed from “Jackson Shrine” to “Stonewall Jackson Death Site.”

https://stonesentinels.com/less-known/salem-church/tour-salem-church/15th-new-jersey/

Monument to 15th New Jersey Infantry Regiment

Description:

This tall, stone monument located near the historic Salem Church is dedicated to the 15th New Jersey Infantry regiment. It marks the site of a bloody battle between them and the Confederate 14th Georgia regiment in which around 116 men were killed before the Union side emerged on top. The monument is a pillar on a rectangular base topped with a statue of an infantryman shielding his eyes. Each side of the base has a different inscription and the front of the base also has a relief of two rifles with a cartridge case. It is similar in appearance to the nearby monument to the 23rd NJ regiment. In a 1909 newspaper report in The Free Lance-Star on the dedication of the monument, an ex-confederate Colonel spoke admiringly of the regiment. He claimed they were made up of some of the very first volunteers for the Union and praised their patriotism. “The survivors of that noble organization…mark with fitting memorials the ground whereon they won immortality”, wrote Colonel Richardson. The monument was re-dedicated by the New Jersey Centennial Commission in 1964, which was founded in the 50s to foster national unity in the face of the Civil Rights movement and the Cold War.

https://www.waukeganparks.org/

Orion Howe Memorial

Description:

Orion Perseus Howe was a Union drummer boy in Company C, of the 55th Illinois Infantry. On 19th May 1863 at the battle of Vicksburg he was present on the field and was ordered by Colonel Malmborg to go to General Sherman and request the supply of cartradiges for Malmborg's men. He was 14 years old at the time. Wounded, and facing severe gunfire, Howe is said to have courageously made his way to Sherman and ‘called as loud as he could calibre 54’. He is said to have only permitted medical attention to his wound after Sherman promised to get the ammunition to his regiment. Howe graduated from Annapolis in 1870, and received a congressional medal of honour on April 23rd 1896. He is, to this date, the youngest recipient of the award. The statue is located at the Veterans Memorial Plaza in Washington Park and was unveiled in 2006 by the Waukegan Park District. A historical marker is also present

Soldier's of Vermillion County in Spring Hill Cemetery

Description:

This monument, located in Spring Hill Cemetery (also known as Spring Hill Cemetery and Mausoleum), depicts a Union soldier at "Parade Rest" and is dedicated to the men from Vermillion County who fought for the Union during the war. Strikingly, the monument is accompanied by four artillery pieces (siege mortars) and is en-circled by buried civil war dead or a "soldier's circle". The cemetery section also includes veterans from other conflicts. The monument was erected by the Vermilion County Veterans Monument Association in 1900 and was designed by Captain Nehemia C. Hinsdale, a veteran of the war. It was dedicated on July 4th, 1901.

https://www.cem.va.gov/cems/nchp/danvilleil.asp

The Soldier's Monument in Danville National Cemetery

Description:

The Soldier's Monument at Danville National cemetery is located on a cemetery that was designated a national cemetery in 1898 and was a dedicated burial site for veterans of the civil war who had died at the National Home for Disabled Volunteers (est. 1897). The remains of 99 veterans were reinterred in 1901 to a new cemetery at the east end of the campus. The scultpure was designed by Clark Noble, and the monument was constructed by the Van Amring Granite Company. The scultpure is a bronze statue of a civil war soldier holding his rifle atop a granit base. The monument is located within the innermost circle of three circles where veterans are laid to rest. The monument was dedicated on 30th May 1917.

Confederate Mound at Oak Woods Cemetery

Description:

Located in Chicago’s Oak Wood Cemetery, the Confederate Mound is situated on a former mass grave for confederate prisoners of war, who died at Camp Douglas (1862-65). In 1887, the Ex-Confederate Association of Chicago received permission by the government to erect a memorial in the government lot of the cemetery. The mound is elliptically shaped and at its centre a granite obelisk towers above the cemetery, at its base are three bass-reliefs depicting scenes of war, including: “The Call to Arms”, “A Soldier’s Death Dream”, and “A Veteran’s Return Home.” Set atop the large shaft is a bronze sculpture of an unarmed confederate soldier, its image is based on the painting “Appomattox” by John A. Elder. The memorial was funded by the Chicago United Confederate Camp No. 8, and their commander, General John C. Underwood, provided the design. The monument was dedicated on May 30th, 1895. The commemorative space also includes four bronze plaques inscribed with the names of the dead (funded by the Commission for Marking the Graves of Confederate Dead in 1911); four artillery pieces; the graves of unknown Union guards from Camp Douglas; and trees, planted in 1953 by Louisiana and Mississippi Governors.

https://www.amherst.edu/news/news_releases/2012/03/node/384752

Stearns' Cannon

Description:

The cannon stored in Amherst College is a movable memorial to one of its students Frazar Stearns. During the war, Frazar followed his chemistry professor to attend the Battle of New Bern on March 14, 1862 and was killed there. The cannon was brought back along with Frazar’s coffin and is treated as a substitute for the bright young man. Originally a Confederate cannon, it was seized by the 21st Regiment Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry during the Battle. The regiment voted to give it to the College as a tribute to the fallen soldier.

https://www.hmdb.org/m.asp?m=61985/

Civil War Seacoast Mortar (Denver, CO)

Description:

An iron, 13-inch Seacoast Mortar with the year “1822” embossed on the barrel. A plaque in the cement sidewalk below the back of the cannon describes it as “Civil War Artillery 13-inch Seacoast Mortar. Donated in 1897 by the Grand Army of the Republic.” The mortar mouth points NNE. The mortar muzzle is engraved with the words “Fort Pitt, PA 1822” and the letter “P.” above the figures “17,196 lbs No. 1022 J.M.B.”

Townsend Soldiers and Sailors Monument

Description:

Located in the Townsend Town Common at Main and School Streets in Townsend, Massachusetts, this standing soldier statue is one of several done in this style ("The Volunteer") by artist Theo Alice Ruggles Kitson. The first "Volunteer" was sculpted in 1902 for Newburyport. The Townsend Volunteer was gifted through a bequest of $10,000 from John Birney Blood, who had served in the 53rd Massachusetts Infantry. Blood enlisted when he was 22 years old, and his unit served in the Port Hudson Campaign, LA in 1863. While he returned home, his brother, Abijah Blood, did not. He died at age 91 in 1931, and the statue was dedicated the following year. By this late date, the construction of Civil War monuments in Massachusetts had largely ceased, due in part to the Depression.


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